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A WORLD WAR I, HONOUR ROLL

DYING FOR FREEDOM ISN’T THE WORST THAT CAN HAPPEN
…BEING FORGOTTEN IS.

WE REMEMBER

MARA and RAMA World War 1, Roll of Honour

In memory of those of Mara and Rama, who made the supreme sacrifice

And

In honour of those who served in the Great War, 1914-1918


GREATER LOVE THAN THIS NO MAN HATH, THAT HE LAY DOWN HIS LIFE FOR HIS FREINDS.

ARDAGH, ARTHUR HOLFORD-

BARNES, William Chester: regimental number 853765, enlisted in the177th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, in Orillia, January 25, 1917, he was single, 21, a farmer, living near Udney. William was born in Rama Twp. (Sebright) in 1896, a son of William Charles Barnes & Hannah Jane Hargrave, and later lived in the Udney area of Mara Twp. He arrived in England, May 14, 1917, and joined the 4th Battalion C.M.R., in France, Sept. 8, 1917. Lance Corporal Barnes, was killed by enemy machine gun fire, while in charge of a Lewis Gun section, on October 1, 1918, in Abancourt France. He was with the 4th(Canadian Mounted Rifles) Battalion. William is buried in the Sancourt British Cemetery, Sancourt, France. His name appears on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.– He was the brother of Belle, Mary, Gertrude, Mae, Pearl, James, John, Annie, & Joseph. (photo in WW1 album)

(Sancourt is a village in the Department of the Nord, 5 kilometres north-west of Cambrai . Historical Information: Sancourt village was captured by the Canadian Corps on the 29th September 1918. The British Cemetery was made in October 1918. There are now over 200, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, 20 are unidentified. The cemetery covers an area of 634 square metres and is enclosed by a rubble wall)

BETHUNE, Angus Joseph: regimental number 657035, enlisted in the 162nd (Parry Sound) Battalion, in Powassan, January 11. 1916. He was single, 27, a Farmer, living in Powassan, Parry Sound District. Private Bethune was born in Rama, in 1888, a son of Fergus Bethune & Catherine McDonald. In the late 1890’s, Fergus, a teamster, moved his family to the Powassan area, as lumbering in Rama was on the decline. Overseas, Angus joined the 4th(Canadian Mounted Rifles) Battalion,and participated in the Battle of Passchendaele, Oct. 26 & 27, 1917. He died in France, November 18, 1917.The CEF records state “Circumstances of Casualty “Killed in Action”
This soldier was wounded in the legs by an enemy shell while on duty at a strong point on the LENS ROAD. He received immediate attention, but died shortly after while on the way to the Dressing Station.”
He is buried in the Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, grave XIII, A. 6.
(photo in WW1 album)

Villers-au-Bois is a village in the Department of the Pas-de-Calais, 11 kilometres north-west of Arras. –Historical Information: This cemetery was begun by the French but was used by Commonwealth divisions and field ambulances from the time they took over this part of the front in July 1916 until September 1918. It is associated particularly with the Canadian Corps whose headquarters were nearby and many of the graves in Plots V to X date from April 1917 and the Battle of Vimy Ridge. After the Armistice, a few graves were brought in from isolated positions in the neighbourhood. Villers Station Cemetery now contains 1,208 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 32 German war graves. )

BETSKO, Matvei (Mike): regimental number 868172, enlisted into the 182nd (Ontario County) Battalion, April 11, 1916, he was single, born in Russia in 1898, and working in Longford Mills as a labourer. For next of kin, he lists his father Julian in Russia, address unknown. Private Betsko, was transferred to the 2nd Battalion-Mounted Rifles, Canadian Infantry, (Eastern Ontario Regiment), 3rd. Division. He was killed in action, November 6, 1917, at the age of 19, in the Battle of Passchendaele. His name appears on panel 10-26-28, in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE. — over the two staircases leading from the main hall is the inscription: HERE ARE RECORED NAMES OF OFFICIERS AND MEN WHO FELL IN YPRES SALIENT BUT WHOM THE FORTUNE OF WAR DENIED THE KNOWN AND HONOURED BURIAL GIVEN TO THIER COMRADES IN DEATH

BLACK, Thomas Howard: regimental number 745329, 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, enlisted November 8, 1915. Thomas, 31, single, was born in England, his family farmed in Mara, (Atherley), Con. 10, lot 29, a son of Thomas Brett Black & Mary Anne Marshall. Private Black was transferred to the 3rd Battalion, Canadian Infantry, (Central Ontario Regiment). He was killed in action, during the battle of Hill 70, August 19, 1917,as was, Pte. T. Carrick, of Rama, who was also drafted ito the 3rd. Battalion. He had two brothers, W.L. Black living in Eyebrow, Saskatchewan, and Pte. Richard Godfrey, with the 177th Battalion. Pte. Black’s name appears on a rampart in the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France. The family grave marker in the Atherley Union Cemetery, also honours his sacrifice for our county. His name appears on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
The following is taken from a letter written by Private J. A. Corvie, France, to Private R. G. Black, who went overseas with the 177th Battalion:–
It is with the very deepest regret I write to give you what details I can regarding the death of your brother, T. H. Black. He was killed in action on Sunday morning, August 19th. His personal belongings were turned into headquarters, excepting his ring, which at the time of his burial, was taken off by one of the boys and given to me to forward to you. I am sorry. I cannot state the place of his burial at present, but will be able to do so later. He was buried with Thos. Carrick of Washago and a man named Kilmore. Captain Scott, 1st Division Chaplain, read the burial service over the grave. He was given the very best burial conditions would permit.

CAMPBELL, Robert Alexander: regimental number 3033613, was drafted February 18, 1918, at the age of 27, he was single, living in Gamebridge, working as an Engineer. Born in Mara (Gambridge) in 1889, a son of Donald Campbell & Annie Cowie. Private Campbell, was killed in action, September 13, 1918, with the 19th Battalion. The CEF Burial records read” while relief was in progress on the night of September 13, 1918, he was instantly killed by enemy shell fire, west bank of canal du nord, near Sains-les-Marquion” He is buried in the Dominion Cemetery, Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt, Pas de Calias, France. The Campbell family grave marker in the Gamebridge Cemetery also honours his sacrifice for our nation.

(Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt is 16 kilometres south-east of Arras.
Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt was captured by the 57th (West Lancashire) and 52nd (Lowland) Division on the night of the 1st-2nd September, 1918. Dominion Cemetery was made by Canadian units in September, 1918, after the storming by the Canadian Corps of the Drocourt-Queant Line.)

CARRICK, Ernest Nelson: regimental number 868143, enlisted into the 182nd (Ontario County) Battalion, April 4, 1916, single, a farmer’s son. Ernest was born in Rama, in 1897, he was the son of John Carrick & Mary Ida McDaniels. Private Carrick was transferred to the 116th Battalion, he died from battlefield wounds incurred in Somme, France, September 8, 1916, and is buried in the Kensal Green (All Souls’) Cemetery, London, United Kingdom. The family grave stone in the Ramona United Church Cemetery, pays tributes to his sacrifice for our country. (photo in WW1 album)

CARRICK, Thomas: regimental number 868144, enlisted into the 182nd (Ontario County) Battalion, April 4, 1916, the same day as Ernest Carrick, the Attestation Papers indicate he was 18, & records his birthday as November 6, 1897, however the Ontario Birth registry documents indicate he was born January 6, 1900, in Rama. He stood 5′ 2 3/4 ” tall, and was the son of John Thomas Carrick & Jessie McGregor. Private Carrick was killed in action, August 19, 1917, while with the 3rd Battalion, in the Battle of Hill 70, as was, Pte. Black, of Athereley. His body was not recovered, his name appears on the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France. His brother Nathan also served overseas. (photo in WW1 album)

CARTWRIGHT, Lionel : regimental number 745343, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, December 1, 1915. He was single, 25, a Miller, living in Mara (Brechin). Born in Rama (Longford Mills) in 1891, a son of Thomas Cartwright & Caroline Johnson. He was transferred to the 3rd. Battalion, at the Battle of Passchendaele, he was reported missing, presumed dead, November 6, 1917. His name appears on panel 18-24-30, in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE. — over the two staircases leading from the main hall is the inscription: HERE ARE RECORED NAMES OF OFFICIERS AND MEN WHO FELL IN YPRES SALIENT BUT WHOM THE FORTUNE OF WAR DENIED THE KNOWN AND HONOURED BURIAL GIVEN TO THIER COMRADES IN DEATH. His name appears on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, Branch 488, 4th Concession, Brechin.

CLARKE, Francis Henry: regimental number 3035940, Francis was drafted, in October 1918. He was single, a farmer, living in Utterson, where his family had relocated to operate a Hotel. He was born in Rama, in 1891, a son of Pat Clarke & Maria Newman. Private Clarke, was placed with the 12th Reserve Battalion(Canadian Engineers/ Railway Troops), he died, of pneumonia, on February 12, 1919, in Bramshot Hospital, England. He is buried in Grayshott (St. Joseph) Roman Catholic Churchyard, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

CLARKE, Milton : regimental number 192922, enlisted in the 92nd (48th Highlanders) Battalion, August 19, 1915. He was single, 19, an Electrical Engineer, who had worked at the Big Chute Plant, then went to Toronto, where he worked at a Hydro station . Born in Burks Falls, in 1896, a son of Charles William Clarke & Daisy Dean Leake. The Clarke family moved to Mara (Brechin) to assist Charles’ ailing father who ran a hardware store in Brechin, in the early 1900’s. They still resided in Brechin at the time Milton enlisted. After training in Toronto and England as a Signaller, Signaller Clarke, was assigned to the 13th (Royal Highlanders) Battalion, also known as the Canadian Black Watch. He was transferred to France on November 1, 1916. Signaller Clarke, was killed in action, on December 1, 1916, and is buried in the Villers Station Cemetery, Pas De Calis, France. Grave II. C. 9. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)
The following is the Dec. 1st. 1916, entry in the 13th Battalion War Diary:
” Zouave Valley–the weather in the morning was very cold and dull, and towards mid-day it also became very misty. There was a considerable amount of activity on both sides during the forenoon, but mainly from Trench Artillery, i.e. Mortars, Stokes Guns, etc. About 5.00 p.m. a few rifle Grenades fell near the head of Chalk St., but owing to the mist, it was impossible to ascertain where they came from. About 6.00 p.m. the enemy started to bombard our frontage, between 5.00 p.m. and 6.00 p.m. a large number of both heavy and light Trench Mortars were used, and a great deal of damage was done to our trenches. The enemy also snipped two of our Bombers, near B. 5 Saps, one last night and one early this morning. Owing to the mist it was impossible to make any observations during the day.. About 6.15 p.m. after the enemy bombardment had ceased, an enemy patrol of about twelve men were seen advancing towards 13 .8. Saps, one of our Lewis Guns opened on it, and men fell and were seen no more.”

the appendix on page 15, lists the casualties–6 killed, including 192923 Pte. Clarke, M.O., 4 missing, 9 wounded, 2 Hosp.

CONGDON, Orren John: regimental number 745344, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, on November 8, 1915. He was 22, single, working as a farmer in Atherley. Private Congdon, was born in the town of Uxbridge, in 1893, a son of John Congdon & Annetta Hazzelwood, who had relocated to Atherley. He went overseas in July 1916, and went to trenches in France in March 1917. Corporal Congdon, of ‘B’ Company, was killed in action, July 23, 1917, his body was not recovered, his name appears on the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)
The following letter was written in August 1917, by Colonel Sam Sharpe, Commanding Officer of the 116th. —
” It is my painful duty to inform you that your son, Corp. O.J. Congdon has been missing since an attack on German positions on the morning of July 23. The Battalion had received special order to raid the German lines on a frontage of about 600 yards to a depth of 400 yards. There were two objectives, and “A” Company under Captain Gould took the first objective and captured many prisoners. The other objective was taken by “B” and “C” Companies under Capt. Allen and Major Currie, respectively. They reached their objectives and inflicted much loss on the enemy, bombed his dugouts and took many prisoners. On the whole we captured about 60 prisoners, and the Battalion received complimentary messages from the Brigadier, the Divisional Commander, and Corps Commander-in-Chief, but these messages, I am afraid, offer small consolation to the fathers and mothers and relatives of those who have fallen, or who are missing. It was with exceeding great regret that we learned that your son was among the missing. Orren was always bright and cheerful and was an encouragement to the other men. He was never out of sorts but always cheerful under the most adverse conditions. Although he is marked missing I cannot hold out any hope that he is alive. He was in a platoon with a son of a cousin of mine, Lieut. Lennox, and who is a fine boy also. They are missing together. I have only one message for you, namely, that I am afraid they are both killed, but there is a possibility that they have been wounded and are prisoners, but I am afraid that we shall never see the boys again. Orren carried on in a manner that reflected great credit on him, and on the unit to which he belonged. He was popular in the Battalion, and his loss will be keenly felt. On behalf of the officers, non-commissioned officers and men of the Battalion I desire to convey to you our sincere sympathy in your loss. Please convey to all friends and members of the family our regret at the loss of such a splendid soldier. We hope that you will take comfort and solace in the consciousness that if he has died, he did his full duty to his King and Country, and his loss should be an inspiration to those who come after. ”

CURRAN, Arnold : regimental number 853378, enlisted in the 177th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, May 16, 1916. He was single, 23, a Mechanic living in Orillia. Born and raised in Rama (Sebright), a son of Mary Curran. His father died when he was just four years of age, then he relocated to Longford, with his mother and Uncle Edward Curran, who had been a father to the boy. About 1909, they moved to Orillia. He was the only support of his mother and aged uncle. He arrived in England, May 14, 1917, and joined the 4th Battalion, in France, Aug. 28, 1917. Pte. Curran was wounded Aug. 8, 1918, at the Battle of Amiens, he died from these wounds, August 11, 1918, at the 48th Casualty Clearing Station, France, at the age of 25. The CEF Burial records read ” while advancing under heavy machine gun fire, he was hit in the head by several machine gun bulletts, stretcher bearers attended to him, and he was removed to No. 48 Casualty Clearing Station, where he succumbed to his wounds.” Pte. Curran is buried in the Viller-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, Somme, France, grave number VIA. B. 14.- The Curran family stone in the Sebright United Church Cemetery, has a memorail to Arnold. (photo in WW1 album)

Villers-Bretonneux is a village 16 kilometres east of Amiens on the straight main road to St Quentin. Villers-Bretonneux Military Cemetery is about 2 kilometres north of the village .
Historical Information: Villers-Bretonneux became famous in 1918, when the German advance on Amiens ended in the capture of the village by their tanks and infantry on 23 April. On the following day, the 4th and 5th Australian Divisions, with units of the 8th and 18th Divisions, recaptured the whole of the village and on 8 August 1918, the 2nd and 5th Australian Divisions advanced from its eastern outskirts in the Battle of Amiens.)

DOLAN, William Joseph : regimental number 261439, enlisted June 6, 1916, in the 212th (Winnipeg Americans)Battalion, in Winnipeg. William was born in Mara (Uptergrove), son of Patrick Joseph Dolan & Mary Jane Clarke. His parents remained in the Uptergrove area. He had worked for several years for James Mahoney, before he went west to join the Hudson Bay Company, as a clerk. He arrived in England, 25 Sept. 1916, on Nov. 21, Pte. Dolan was transferred to the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry,(Eastern Ontario Regt.). He crossed to France, December 23, 1916, and was posted to the 3rd. Entrenching Bn. January 20, 1917. He joined PPCLI in the Vimy Ridge Sector, March 6, 1917, and participated in the 1st Battle of Arras (Vimy Ridge) and the 3rd Battle of Ypres (Passchendaele). He was killed in action, on October 30, 1917, in the Battle of Passchendaele, near the wire of the Meetcheele Ridge Pill Box. His body was never recovered, his name appears on panel 10, in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE. — over the two staircases leading from the main hall is the inscription: HERE ARE RECORED NAMES OF OFFICIERS AND MEN WHO FELL IN YPRES SALIENT BUT WHOM THE FORTUNE OF WAR DENIED THE KNOWN AND HONOURED BURIAL GIVEN TO THIER COMRADES IN DEATH. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. He was survived by three brothers, Martin of Winnipeg, Jerry in Chicago, and James of Toronto, who was with the Sportsman Battalion in France.–(photo in WW1 album)

DUFFY, Daniel: regimental number 1003711, was born in Rama, 4th of June 1880, a son of Francis Duffy & Ellen Norris, of O’Connell. Private Duffy, enlisted with the 227th (Men of the North) Battalion, July 17, 1916. in Sudbury, where he was working as a Lumberman. Just after he started his training in Niagara on the Lake, he was admitted to the Hamilton/Brant Military Hospital on July 29, 1916. He remained there for over two months, and died of Pleurisy, November 2, 1916. His remains were interned in St. Columbkille’s Cemetery, Uptergrove, Ont., the grave marker honours Pte. Duffy’s commitment to serve for King and Country.

DUXBURY, John Lord: regimental number 745352, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, November 16, 1915. He was single, 26, living in Brechin as a baker. He was born in England, in 1890, where his parents remained. Pte. Duxbury, remained with the 116th, and died of wounds, August 24, 1916. He is buried in the Grange-Over-Sands Cemetery, Lancashire, United Kingdom, grave number 1032. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

EDWARDS, Percy: regimental number 643874, enlisted in the 157(Simcoe Foresters), January 26, 1916, along with his twin brother Roy, he was later transferred to the 76th, then to the 21st. He was single, 19, a Mill Setter, living in Orillia. Born in Washago, in 1896, he was raised in Rama, (Longford), Front Range, lot 23, a son of Edward Edwards & Alice Lina Howe. While with the 21st Battalion, Private Edwards, was killed in action, September 15, 1916, in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, (first use of tanks). His name is engraved on a panel in the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France.– A Plaque in St. Paul’s Church, Washago, reads: ‘To the Glory of God and in proud and loving memory of Percy Edwards, Roy Hawkins, Albert Rennie who laid down their lives in the Great War, 1914-1918. Their names shall live forevermore’ (photo in WW1 album)

FAULKNER, Robert : His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

FOUNTAIN, Henry: regimental number, D3317298, was drafted November 3, 1917, he was single, a farm labourer, living in Orillia. Born in Simcoe County, in 1897, a son of Joseph Fountain & Annie Boyle, who had relocated to Mara, (Uptergrove). Henry’s Unit arrived in England in April, 1918, by August he was assigned to the 54th (Kootney) Battalion, and joined the Unit, in the field in France, August 23. Just over a month later, he was killed in action, September 27, 1918, in the Battle of Bourlon Wood. The CEF Burial records state ” he took part with his Battalion in an attack on enemy positions near Bourlon. After reaching and consolidating the objective, he was hit and instantly killed by a machine gun bullett during an enemy counter attack.” Pte. Fountain, is buried in the Bourlon Wood Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, grave I.A.8. (photo in WW1 album)

(Bourlon is a village approximately 6 kilometres west of Cambrai. It lies between the main Cambrai to Bapaume road (N30) and the Cambrai to Arras road (D939).
Historical Information: On its South-East side, stretching nearly to Fontaine-Notre Dame, is Bourlon Wood, and the village and the wood were the scene of desperate fighting in the Battle of Cambrai 1917; the 40th Division, which with the Guards and the 62nd Division bore the brunt of this fighting, has placed a memorial altar in Bourlon Church. At the end of the Battle the British troops were withdrawn from Bourlon, and the wood and the village were ultimately retaken by the 3rd Canadian and 4th Canadian Divisions on the 27th September 1918. The village was later “adopted” by the Borough of Hove. Bourlon Wood Cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps Burial Officer in October 1918.)

FOWLER, George: His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

GETHONS, William Joseph: regimental number 745529, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, April 15, 1916, in Beaverton. He was 24, single, working as a labourer in Longford Mills. Born in Rama, (Longford) in 1892, a son of Patrick Gethons and Elizabeth Jane Wesley. On May 15, 1916 when Pte. Gethons, and other recruits made the trek from Beaverton to Oshawa, he experienced breathing problems, and became weak, he was given tonic and kept on light duty, but no improvement, a month later, at the Niagara Camp, it was recommended he be sent to a Sanitarium. Private Gethons died from phthisis (tuberculosis), compounded by the flu, at the age of 26, November 14, 1918, at the Muskoka Free Hospital in Gravenhurst. He is interned at St. Columbkille’s Cemetery, Uptergrove, Ont., his grave marker pays honour to his commitment to serve for King and Country.

GINSBERG, Samuel : regimental number 643806, enlisted in the 157th Battalion, February 9, 1916. He was single, 17, a Student, boarding in Orillia. Born in Rochester, New York, in 1898. His family relocated to Toronto in 1900, and sometime after that, his parents relocated to Brechin where they operated a General Store . He spent his 18th birthday on the Ocean, and his 19th birthday in the Trenches. In August 1916, he was reported wounded, but was able to return to the trenches within a week. He had been transferred to the 4th(Canadian Mounted Rifles) Battalion, when he died from injuries from a shell which exploded and blew off his leg, May 3, 1917. He is buried in the La Targette Brittish Cemetery, Pas de Calais, Neuville-St. Vaast, France. Grave number I. A. 12. Pte. Ginsberg was survived by his parents, five brothers, Ben, Julius, Abraham, & Morris, and two sisters, Esther and Sarah. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)

( Neuville-St. Vaast is a village 6.5 kilometres north of Arras, a little east of the road from Bethune to Arras. La Targette British Cemetery lies to the south-west of the village.
Historical Information: La Targette British Cemetery, formerly known as Aux-Rietz Military Cemetery, was begun at the end of April 1917 and used by field ambulances and fighting units until September 1918. Nearly a third of the graves have an artillery connection; in March-April 1917, the artillery of the 2nd Canadian and 5th Divisions, and certain heavy artillery units, had their headquarters in a deep cave at Aux-Rietz. Sixteen graves were brought into the cemetery from the immediate neighbourhood after the Armistice. The cemetery contains 638 First World War burials, 41 of them unidentified )

GLOVER, John Donald: when the war broke out, John was living in Sudbury, working for the Cochrane Company, he was Captain of the 97th, previously he had been a drill instructor for the 48th Highlanders. He enlisted on August 4, 1914, the very day the war was declared, and was made Adjutant of the 4th(Canadian Mounted Rifles, Central Ontario) Battalion, part of the first contingent. Born in Mara, (Gamebridge), in 1889; a son of William Glover & Mary McRae. Captain Glover was killed in action, April 23, 1915, at Langemarck, Belgium. The 4th Battalion attempted to gain control of Mauser Ridge, in the Second Battle of Ypres.
The C.E.F. War Casualty report reads –“Whilst together with the Officier Commanding of his Battalion, leading the forward line during an advance made to check the onrush of the enemy, after the reirement of the French-Algerian troops in the vicinity of St. Julien, and when, owing to the heavy enemy bombardment and the numerous casualties, suffered, he was about to give his men the order to dig themselves in, when he was hit in the head and instantly killed by a bullet fired from an enemy sniper’s rifle”
His name appears on panel 18-24-26-30, in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE.–
A family marker in the Gamebridge Cemetery, honours his sacrifice for our country. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. Captain Glover was mentioned in dispatches. (photo in WW1 album)

The 4th Battalion War Diary- entry for April 23, 1915- reads: ” VLAMERTINGHE–12.30 a.m. The Battalion moved off, crossed No. 4 Pontoon bridge of the Yser Canal at 4.10 a.m.–4.30 a.m. Battalion halted at a farm house 1200 yards West of Picklen where the enemy were entrenched. We commenced to advance towards ridge at 5.25 a.m. B. Coy. leading and occupying a portion of 150 yards frontage. The other Coys following. Artillery and Machine Gun fire of the Enemy very heavy. Entrenched at 400 yards from the Enemy. Lieut- Col. Birchall took command of C. Coy, when Coy Commander was wounded.
7.p.m. Lieut-Col. Birchall killed.
9. p.m. Battalion came out of motion, relieved by East Yorks. Adjutant (Cpt. Glover) killed, 2nd in command wounded, 16 other casualties among Officers, other ranks 487. The Battalion congregated at Transport lines B.29.B. and remained there during the night. Major Ballantine in Command. ”

GLOVER, Norman Robert: regimental number 20429, enlisted in the 10th Battalion in Calgary, Alberta, where he was working as a clothing salesman. He was 24, stood 6’2″ tall, and enlisted the same day as his brother John, Aug. 4, 1914. Norman was born in Mara (Gamebridge) a son of William Glover & Mary McRae. Sergeant Glover, was killed in action, April 23, 1915, at Langemarck, Belgium, in the same battle and same day as his brother John Donald. In the Second Battle of Ypres, the 10th Battalion’s mission was to gain control of the Kitcheners Wood by a surprise attack in the dark of night, they checked the German advance, but two-thirds of the Battalion, did not survive.

The C.E.F. War Casualty report reads ” He was shot through the head and stomach and killed at about midnight on April23nd/23rd 1915. whilst taking part in a charge on a wood in the vicinity of St. Julian”

Sgt. Glover’s name appears on panel 24-28-30, in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE.–
A family marker in the Gamebridge Cemetery, honours his sacrifice for our country. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)

GORING, Earl: regimental number 643884, part of the 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, he enlisted January 26, 1916, in Orillia, he was 19, single, a farmer. Born at Rama Portage, Rama Township, January 25, 1897 son of Edgar Goring & Idella Barager. Earl was wounded September 9, 1916, at Somme, after 8 months in the hospital, he rejoined his new regiment the 76th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, (Central Ontario Regt.) 4th Division, just four days before Vimy Ridge. Pte. Goring met his death on November 15, 1917, at Paschendaele, he was carrying a wounded officer to safety, when a bursting shell killed them both. He is buried in the VLAMERTINGHE NEW MILITARY Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium, grave IX. D. (photo in WW1 album)

(Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery is located 5 Kms west of Ieper town centre and to the south of the village of Vlamertinge (Vlamertinge is the modern spelling of Vlamertinghe). the left hand side of the Bellestraat, after crossing the N38.
Historical Information: For much of the First World War, Vlamertinghe (now Vlamertinge) was just outside the normal range of German shell fire and the village was used both by artillery units and field ambulances. Burials were made in the original Military Cemetery until June 1917, when the New Military Cemetery was begun in anticipation of the Allied offensive launched on this part of the front in July. Although the cemetery continued in use until October 1918, most of the burials are from July to December 1917. The cemetery now contains 1,813 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.)

GOWANLOCK, James Laidlaw : regimental number 643833, enlisted in the 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, January 26, 1916. He was 27, single, a Farmer, living in Orillia, the 1911 census indicates he was a Domestic, on the Robert Leith farm, in Mara. Born in Bruce County, in 1888, a son of Andrew Gowanlock & Elizabeth Laidlaw, his next of kin was his brother Douglas of Mara (Uptergrove). Overseas, he was transferred to the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, and was killed in action, August 24, 1917, in the trenches, at Fosse 10, France. He is buried in the Aix-Noulette Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Grave I.L.13. His brother Robert was killed in action 6 days earlier. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

(Aix-Noulette is a village in the Department of the Pas-de-Calais, about 13 kilometres south of Bethune on the main road to Arras.
Historical Information: The Cemetery Extension was begun by French troops early in 1915, and the two French plots are next to the Communal Cemetery. It was taken over by the 1st and 2nd Divisions in February, 1916, and used by fighting units and Field Ambulances until October, 1918. It was increased after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the battlefields to the East. There are now 749 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war commemorated here, 61 being unidentified. There are also 502 French burials here. The cemetery covers an area of 5,198 square metres and is enclosed by a red brick wall on three sides, and on the South by the wall of the Communal Cemetery.
No. of Identified Casualties: 1190)

GOWANLOCK, Robert George : regimental number 602887, enlisted August 7, 1915, in the 34th Battalion. He was single, 29, a Farmer. Born in Saugeen Township, in Bruce County, in 1886, a son of Andrew Gowanlock & Elizabeth Laidlaw. He went overseas in the fall of 1915, and wounded in 1916, he also had trench fever, but recovered and joined the tunneling company. Private Gowanlock, was killed in action, August 18, 1917, in the trenches at Loos, France. He was survived by three brothers, Wm. T. in Uhthoff, James in the 116th Battalion, and Douglas in Atherley, and one sister Mrs. Ross, in Toronto. His name is engraved on a panel in the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France. His brother James was also killed in action, just 6 days later. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

GRAY, Charles Alexander : regimental number 440943, enlisted in the 28th (North West) Battalion, in Manitoba, November 29, 1915. He was single, 27, a Farmer, living in Winnipeg, Manitoba. We was a son of Henry (Harry) Charles Gray & Marion Edwards Reid, who farmed in Rama (Sebright). The two oldest children of the Gray family were born in Rama, then around 1888, they moved to Manitoba where Charles was born in 1889. The 1891 Rama census indicates the family had returned to the Sebright area, where they remained until approximately 1900. During this tenure, three more siblings were born in Rama Twp. The 1901 census has the family in Swan River, Manitoba. On October 12, 1916, the Orillia Times, reports that “Pte. Charles Alexander Gray, a nephew of Mrs. R.O. Smith of Orillia, and Mr. Fred J. Gray, of Atherley, and a native of Sebright, is reported died from wounds on Sept. 15. He was wounded in the Battle of the Somme, France.” The CEF casualty report indicates he died at No. 3, Casuality Clearing Station, from gun shot wounds penetrating the abdomen and slight wounds in left arm. He is interned, in the Puchevillers British Cemetery, Somme, France. Grave IV. C. 45.

( Puchevillers is a village on the D11 about 19 kilometres north-east of Amiens. The British Cemetery is a little west of the village.
Historical Information: In June 1916, just before the opening of the Battles of the Somme, the 3rd and 44th Casualty Clearing Stations came to Puchevillers. Plots I to V, and almost the whole of Plot VI were made by those hospitals before the end of March 1917. For the next two months the 2nd/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station used the cemetery. Plot VII contains for the most part the graves of men who died in the German advance in 1918, many of whom were buried by the 49th Clearing Station in March 1918, or by the 48th Labour Group in August. Puchevillers British Cemetery contains 1,763 First World War burials. )

JUFFS, Robert Ernest: regimental number 871306, enlisted February 28, 1916, in the 183rd (Manitoba Beavers) Battalion. He was single, 22, a Clerk, living in Winnipeg at the Imperial Hotel. His listed next of kin, was his brother Stuart John known as Jack, of Udney. Born in England in 1893, Robert along with his brothers Stuart and Fred came to Canada in 1912, and settled in Mara for some time, before he headed West. Overseas he was transferred to the 16th (Canadian Scottish) Battalion. Private Juffs, was killed in action, August 8, 1918, at the Battle of Amiens, and is buried in the Hangard Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

(Hangard is a village 5 kilometres south of Villers-Bretonneux. Hangard Communal Cemetery is a little east of the village.
Historical Information: At the end of March 1918, Hangard was at the junction of the French and Commonwealth forces defending Amiens. From 4 to 25 April, the village and Hangard Wood were the scene of incessant fighting, in which the line was held and the 18th Division were particularly heavily engaged. On 8 August, the village was cleared by the 1st and 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles. The original extension to the communal cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps in August 1918. It consisted of 51 graves in the present Plot I. It was greatly increased after the Armistice when graves were brought in, mainly from the battlefields of Hangard and Hangard Wood)

KELLY, Alphonse Patrick : regimental number 139125, member of the, 75th Battalion, Central Ontario Regiment, he enlisted in Toronto, July 30, 1915. He was 19, single, a shipper at Wicketts in Toronto. Born in Mara, (Brechin) Feb. 15, 1896, son of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O’Donnell. Private Kelly was killed by a sniper, November 18, 1916, in Somme. His name is listed on the VIMY Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France. He had three brothers also serving in the CEF. (photo in WW1 album)

KING, William: regimental number 404538, enlisted in 58th Battalion (Central Ontario Regiment). A resident of Rama. Private King was killed in action, June 13, 1916. His name is inscribed on panel 18-24–26-30 in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE. –

MacDONLD, Russell Stewart, Regiment number 304524. Born in Mara in 7 Aug. 1891, as son of Donald (Daniel) C McDONALD and Elizabeth STEWART. He was a medical student at Queen’s University, when he enlisted in the 50th Queen’s Battery, Nov. 2, 1915. Overseas he was farrier with the Canadian Field Artillery. Cpl. MacDONLAD was killed in action, Oct, 24, 1917. He is buried Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium, grave IV. B. 7.

Note: Russell signed his name as MACDONALD, while his father and siblings went by MCDONLAD.

The village of Reninghelst (now Reningelst) was occupied by Commonwealth forces from the late autumn of 1914 to the end of the war and was sufficiently far from the front line to provide a suitable station for field ambulances. The earliest burials took place in the Churchyard, but in November 1915, the New Military Cemetery was opened. It remained in use until September 1918.

There are now 798 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the cemetery.

MacKENZIE, Charles Roy : regimental number 27519, enlisted September 18, 1914, in the 15th (48th Highlanders) Battalion, he reported directly to the Valcartier training camp in Quebec. Private MacKenzie was single, 22, a Construction Foreman. Born in Beaverton, in 1891, a son of John R. MacKenzie & Elizabeth Smith. He died of pneumonia, on January 26, 1915, and is buried in the Netheravon (All Saints) Churchyard, Wiltshire, United Kingdom. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

MacKENZIE, David: regimental number 3317663, was drafted in March 1918 and served in the 8th Res. Battalion. He was single, 20, he and his brother Charles jointly owned the farm of his late grandfather Peter Calderwood. Born in Mara (Fairvalley) a son of Murdoch MacKenzie & Margaret Calderwood. After training in Oshawa and Niagara-on- the- lake, he was sent to England, just two days later he became ill, and died August 23, 1918. He is buried at Aldershot Military Cemetery, Hampshire, England. A grave marker in the Fairvalley Methodist Cemetery honours his sacrifice for our country. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)

McCORKELL James Ignatius: he enlisted October 13, 1915, as a Lieutenant of the 116th (Ontario County) Infantry Battalion. He was a school teacher in Atherley, Mara S.S. #5, from 1913 to 1915. While training in Canada, he served as a recruiter for the 116th, his name appears on the Attestation papers of several Mara & Rama recruits. Born in Mara, in 1895, a son of Patrick Joseph McCorkell & Mary O’Donnell. Just prior to his departure overseas, Lieutenant McCorkell, was married to Cecilia Proctor, in December 1916. He had obtained a Captaincy, but in order to get into action quicker, he reverted to the rank of Lieutenant. He was killed in action, August 12, 1918, at the age of 23, and is buried in Bouchoir New British Cemetery, Somme, France. grave II.B.57. The stone reads, ‘Lieut. J. I. J. McCorkell, 116th Battalion Canadian Infantry/12th August 1918 Age 23/Greater love than this no man hath/that he lay down his life for his friends’. His name also appears in the ‘Roll of Honour of the Ontario Teachers who served in the Great War 1914-1918’ published by Ryerson Press: 1922. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)

Aug. 22. 1918- Orillia Packet & Times–Lieut. I. J. McCorkell Killed

The first death reported among the Orillia soldiers, as the result of the British offensive, was that of Lieut. Ignatius J. McCorkell, who was killed in action on August 12th. Though not a resident of the town, Lieut. McCorkell had spent so much of his time here, for three years as a student at the Collegiate Institute, and for two years while teaching at Atherley, that he was widely known and very popular. He tried to enlist in the University company which went to reinforce the Princess Pats in the early days of the war, but was rejected on account of his eyes. However, he succeeded in getting into the Ontario County Battalion in October, 1915, and took an active part in recruiting both it and the second battalion. He did not succeed in getting overseas till April, 1917. Four months previously, in December, 1916, he was married to Miss Cecelia Proctor of Beaverton, a niece of Mrs. A. G. Cavana, Orillia. Besides his parents, Lieut. McCorkell is survived by four brothers and four sisters–Peter McCorkell of Superior, Wisconsin; Vincent McCorkell, St. Paul, Minnesota; John McCorkell of Udney; the Rev. E. J. McCorkell, of St. Michael’s College, Toronto; Mrs. D. O’Donnell, Mrs. R. Gettings, and Mrs. H. McLaughlin, of Udney, and Mrs. J. O’Leary of Seattle, Washington. Lieut. McCorkell, who was just 23 years of age, was just at the opening of what promised to be a bright career. Had he returned it was his intention to enter the profession of law, and to that end he became articled at Osgoode Hall. He has given his life in a great cause, and his memory will long remain green.

McCUAIG, Russell: regimental number 405148, enlisted in Toronto, April 12, 1915, at the age of 26, he was single, working as a bookkeeper. Born on Mara (Brechin) in 1889, a son of Brechin’s Blacksmith, John McCuaig & Rosanna Thompson. Private McCuaig was a member of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps, 4th Division. On September 16, 1918, in the Battle of Cambrai, he suffered gunshot wounds in his left hand and leg, he succumbed to these wounds on September 26, 1918, in the South African Hospital, Abbeville, France. He is buried in the Abbeville Communal Cemetery, Somme, France. He had two brothers, William & John serving overseas.

(The town of Abbeville is on the main road from Paris to Boulogne (N1), about 80 kilometres south of Boulogne. The communal cemetery and communal cemetery extension are located on the left hand side of the road when leaving the town in a north-east direction for Drucat.
Historical Information: For much of the First World War, Abbeville was headquarters of the Commonwealth lines of communication and No.3 BRCS, No.5 and No.2 Stationary Hospitals were stationed there variously from October 1914 to January 1920. The communal cemetery was used for burials from November 1914 to September 1916, the earliest being made among the French military graves. The extension was begun in September 1916.)

McDonald, Frederick Duncan : regimental number 859853. enlisted in the 179th Battalion, March 27, 1916, in Winnipeg. He was 33, single, a cook. Born in 1882, in Victoria County, the eldest son of Donald McDonald & Flora Dougherty, he was raised in Rama Township. Overseas he served in the 43rd Battalion. Private McDonald, died November 20, 1919 in the Spadina Military Hospital, in Toronto, of disease, contacted while overseas. He is buried in the Sebright Union Cemetery. ( His brother Donald Edward, also served overseas, however, he signed his name ‘MacDonald’ )

McLEAN, Donald(Dan) M.M.:regimental number 643928, enlisted in the 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, Feb. 1, 1916. He was single, 27, living in Orillia, working as a fur cutter. Sergeant McLean, was born in Mara, a son of Alexander McLean & Margaret Robert MacDonald. He arrived in England, Oct. 28, 1916, and joined the 116th Bn. in France, March 8, 1917. In the July 22, 1917, Raid, by the 116th, Corp. Dan McLean showed great leadership, he lead his men to their objective, inflicted heavy casualties and personally captured an officer and five men, all of this in face of heavy shelling and machine gun fire. For this Corp. McLean was awarded the Military Medal (MM) for bravery in the field. The Nov. 15, 1917, Orillia Times, reported “Sergt. Dan McLean is reported wounded in the heel with shrapnel, Nov. 3.(at Passchedaele)”. On December 27, 1917, his foot was amputated, and the early indications were he was getting along well. He died of wounds in an English hospital January 18, 1918, and was buried in the cemetery of Ingham, Sulfolk. He was survived by his mother, three brothers and three sisters, Robert, Moose Jaw, Sask.; Neil, Duluth, Mich.; Capt. George McLean, B.A., of the 21st Northumberland Fusileers, B.E.F.; Miss Tena McLean, Houghton, Mich.; Miss Margaret and Mrs. F.H. Horne, Orillia. In June of 1919, his remains had been brought back to Orillia and were laid to rest in the family plot in St. Andrew’s, St. James Cemetery. (photo in WW1 album)

MERKLEY, Lee : regimental number 306617,enlisted in the 42nd Battery, January 5th, 1916. He was single, 21, a Clerk. Born in Simcoe County in 1894, and raised in the Atherley area of Mara, a son of Ambrose Merkley & (Ellen) Helen Boyd. Overseas he was a Gunner in the Canadian Field Artillery, 4th Battery, 1st Bde. Gunner Merkley, died April 10, 1918, at the age of 25. He is buried in the Anzin-St. Aubin British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France, grave IV. B. 21. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin. (photo in WW1 album)

(The village of Anzin-St. Aubin is on the north-western outskirts of Arras. The British Cemetery is on the northern side of the village.
Historical Information: The cemetery was begun by the 51st (Highland) Division early in April 1917, and carried on by artillery units and field ambulances until October 1917. It was then used by the 30th and 57th Casualty Clearing Stations. The 51st Division came back to it in April 1918 and it was closed the following September. The graves of three Indian cavalrymen were brought to it from ANZIN-ST. AUBIN FRENCH MILITARY CEMETERY, which was West of the village, in 1922. The cemetery contains 358 First World War burials, 145 of which belonged, or were attached, to Artillery units.)

MORTON, Alexander Smith:, regimental number, 192914, enlisted in Toronto, October 1, 1915, age 20, in the 92nd Highlanders Battalion, along with his friend from Longford, Carl Filkin. He was born in Rama Twp. (Longford Mills) a son of James Morton & Janet McGill. Pte. Morton trained in Toronto, he left Toronto in April 1916, with the 92nd Battalion, on arrival in England, he was transferred to the 15th Battalion, a Toronto 48th Highland unit of the first contingent. He had only been in the trenches, just one month, when he was killed in action, October 28, 1916. Pte. Filkin, who served with him wrote to his brother, ” Alex, was hit with a piece of shrapnel in the right arm and that the missile pierced his chest. I helped to carry him to the dressing station but he died a few minutes after the wound was dressed” He was 21 years of age. His body remains in the Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez, Pas de Calais, France. Grave II.D.2.– A grave marker in the Longford Mills Cemetery also honours his sacrifice for our county. (photo in WW1 album)

(Souchez is a village 3.5 kilometres north of Arras on the main road to Bethune. The cemetery is about 1.5 kilometres south of the village on the west side of the D937 Arras-Bethune Road.
Historical Information: On 26 September 1915, Souchez was taken from the Germans by French troops, who handed the sector over to Commonwealth forces the following March. The village was completely destroyed. The “Cabaret Rouge” was a house on the main road about 1 kilometre south of the village, at a place called Le Corroy, near the cemetery. On the east side, opposite the cemetery, were dugouts used as battalion headquarters in 1916. The communication trenches ended here, including a very long one named from the Cabaret. The cemetery was begun by Commonwealth troops in March 1916, used until August 1917 (largely by the 47th (London) Division and the Canadian Corps) and – at intervals – until September 1918; these original burials are in Plots I to V inclusive. It was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when more than 7,000 graves were brought in from the battlefields of Arras and from 103 other burial grounds in the Nord and the Pas-de-Calais. The cemetery now contains 7,655 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, more than half of them unidentified.)

PARKIN, George Richard : regimental number 55092, enlisted in the 19th Battalion, November 10, 1914, in Toronto. He was single, 27, a Clerk. Born in England in 1887, his next of kin, (father) remained in England. He immigrated to Canada in 1906, at the age of 19, along with a Fred Juffs. He died of wounds, incurred in Somme, France, September 16, 1916, and is buried in the Albert Communal Cemetery Extension, Somme, France, GRAVE I. N. 5. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

(Albert is a town 28 Kms north-east of Amiens. The Communal Cemetery is on the south-east side of Albert and at the junction of the roads to Peronne (D938) and Bray sur Somme (D329), and the extension is entirely enclosed by it.
Historical Information: Albert was held by French forces against the German advance on the Somme in September 1914. It passed into British hands in the summer of 1915; and the first fighting in July 1916, is known as the Battle of Albert, 1916. It was captured by the Germans on the 26th April 1918, and before its recapture by the 8th East Surreys on the following 22nd August (in the Battle of Albert, 1918,) it had been completely destroyed by artillery fire. The Extension was used by fighting units and Field Ambulances from August 1915 to November 1916, and more particularly in and after September 1916, when Field Ambulances were concentrated at Albert. From November 1916, the 5th Casualty Clearing Station used it for two months. From March 1917, it was not used (except for four burials in March, 1918) until the end of August 1918, when Plot II was made by the 18th Division. During the Second World War the extension was used again, when the French moved into it British casualties from isolated graves in and around Albert. There are now 862 First World War graves here.)

ROGERS, George, M.M. : regimental number 123860, enlisted in the 70th Battalion, Sept. 24, 1915, in St. Thomas. A month later he was transferred to the 91st. Battalion. He was single, 17, a farmer. Born, December 3, 1897, in Liverpool, England, an orphan, he came to Canada at the age of nine, as a Home Child, and joined Hiram and Elizabeth Snoddon, in Sebright, they later relocated to Mara. The Snoddon’s were listed as his next of kin. He sailed for Britain June 29, 1916. Overseas he was drafted into the 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, Battalion. In July 1917, he was awarded the Military Medal, for bravery in the field, (London Gazette 30188). His Battalion was active in the Battle Of Passendaele, October 26 to November 2, 1917. Pte. Rogers, was wounded and reported missing, presumed dead, November 6, 1917. A gravemarker bearing his name, rank and regimental number is in the Hagle Dump Cemetery, Belgium. His name is also listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.

(Hagle Dump Cemetery is 7.5 Kms west of Ieper town centre on the Sint Pietersstraat, a road.
Historical Information: Elverdinge was behind the Allied front line throughout the war, and Hospital Farm and Ferme-Olivier Cemeteries, both in the commune, were used in the earlier years for Commonwealth burials. The cemetery, which was begun in April 1918, during the Battles of Lys, was named after a nearby stores dump. It was used by fighting units and field ambulances until the following October and was enlarged after the Armistice when more than 200 graves were brought into Plots III and IV from the battlefields of the Ypres Salient )

SHEFFIELD, John Herbert : regimental number 745472, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, November 15, 1915. He was single, 25, a farmer, living in Mara (Brechin). Born in Sutton, a son of Thomas H. Sheffield & Susan F. Bloomfield. After training in Canada, his company went overseas in July 1916. Private Sheffield, was killed in action, November 17, 1917, in Belgium. He is buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium. Grave XXII. GG. 14A. His name appears on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, Branch 488, Concession 4, Brechin.

(Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery is located 12 Kms west of Ieper town centre, on the Boescheepseweg, a road leading from the N308 connecting Ieper to Poperinge..
Historical Information: During the First World War, the village of Lijssenthoek was situated on the main communication line between the Allied military bases in the rear and the Ypres battlefields. Close to the Front, but out of the extreme range of most German field artillery, it became a natural place to establish casualty clearing stations. The cemetery was first used by the French 15th Hopital D’Evacuation and in June 1915, it began to be used by casualty clearing stations of the Commonwealth forces. From April to August 1918, the casualty clearing stations fell back before the German advance and field ambulances (including a French ambulance) took their places. The cemetery contains 9,901 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.)

SHILLING, Arthur : regimental number 853773, enlisted in the 177th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, February 12, 1917. He was single, and declared he was 21, a labourer, living in Orillia. Born in Rama (Reserve), 22 March 1900, a son of William & Susan (Wesley) Shilling of the Rama Indian Reservation. Private Shilling, died on October 8, 1920, and is buried in the Rama Chief Island Cemetery, at the age of 20.

SMITH (FISHER) George Henry(Harry): regimental number 453698, enlisted August 18, 1915, at the age of 28. He was born in England, his family relocated to Longford Mills, where he was a labourer in the factory. George is the son of Isaac Fisher Smith & Emma Porter. Private Smith was a member of the Central Ontario Regiment, 58th Battalion, he was killed in action, September 20, 1916. His body remains in the Adanac Military Cemetery, Miraumont, Somme, France, grave I. C. 39.—a marker also exists in the Longford Mills Cemetery. He was a brother of Hardy. (photo in WW1 album)

(Miraumont is a village about 14.5 Kms north-north-east of Albert and the Cemetery is some 3 Kms south of the village on the east side of the road to Courcelette (D107).
Historical Information: The villages of Miraumont and Pys were occupied on 24-25 February 1917 following the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. They were retaken by the Germans on 25 March 1918, but recovered the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the following 24 August. Adanac Military Cemetery (the name was formed by reversing the name “Canada”) was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the Canadian battlefields around Courcelette and small cemeteries surrounding Miraumont)

SMITH (FISHER) Hardy Alfred: regimental number, 745471, he enlisted into the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, November 19, 1915 at the age of 19. He was born in Barrie in 1896, a son of Isaac Fisher Smith & Emma Porter, the family relocated to Longford Mills prior to1901. Private Smith was killed in action, September 29, 1918, and is buried in the St. Olle British Cemetery, France, grave A.12.—The family grave marker in Longford Mills Cemetery, honours the sacrifice Hardy and his brother George made for our country. (photo in WW1 album)

(St. Olle is a village in the Department of the Nord 1 kilometre west of Cambrai on the main road towards Arras.
Raillencourt was carried by the Canadian Corps on the 28th and 29th September, 1918, in the Battle of the Canal du Nord. St. Olle British Cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps in October, 1918.
Casualty Details: UK 1, Canada 96, Total Burials: 97)

STAMP, Herbert Thomas James: regimental number 113567, he enlisted in Toronto with the second contingent Canadian Mounted Rifles, (C.M.R.) unit. He was born May 3, 1891, in Gravenhurst, a son of John Stamp & Margaret Jane Strain, they relocated to Longford Mills where John was sawyer, and Herbert worked in the sawmill as a labourer. Trooper Stamp, had been at the front about six months, when he took part in the battle of Ziltebeck. He was reported missing, presumed dead, August 19, 1917. His name appears on panel 30/32 in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Carved in stone above the central arch of this Memorial are the words: TO THE ARMIES OF THE BRITISH EMPIRE WHO STOOD HERE FROM 1914 TO 1918 AND TO THOSE OF THEIR DEAD WHO HAVE NO KNOWN GRAVE. — over the two staircases leading from the main hall is the inscription: HERE ARE RECORED NAMES OF OFFICIERS AND MEN WHO FELL IN YPRES SALIENT BUT WHOM THE FORTUNE OF WAR DENIED THE KNOWN AND HONOURED BURIAL GIVEN TO THIER COMRADES IN DEATH. (photo in WW1 album)

STILLMAN, Frederick John M.M.: regimental number 59921, enlisted in the 21st Battalion, in Kingston, November 5, 1914. It had been working in Longford Mills as a clerk, his name was listed in the Longford United Church honour roll in 1921. Born 18 July, 1896, in Campbellford, Seymour, Twp. a son of John Stillman & Jennie Millar. Private Stillman was awarded the Military Medal (MM) for bravery in the field, his Citation reads- ” for conspicuous bravery and devotation to duty during operations at St. Eloi, from April 5th to April 10th,(1916) by holding an advanced position in front of No. 6 Crater continuously without receiving food, water or ammununition. Pte. Stillman, with five others, having gathered during hours of darkness, the rations, water, and ammunition supply from dead bodies in the vicinity. They wiped out an enemy bombing party of thirty men (two only escaping) who attacked their position. They captured enemy’s machine gun grew of three, handing same over to Sgt. of the 31st Battn. They captured enemy scout sent to reconnoiter our position, handing him, over to the 19th. Battn. They were subject to an almost continuous and intense enemy bombardment. Then relieved, so exhausted were they, they had to assited out of the line. These men were temporarily attached to the 6th Brigade Machine Gun Company.”
Over the folowing 12 months, he was promoted several times, in May 1917, he was promoted to rank of Sergeant. He was killed in action, August 15, 1917, in the attack at Hill 70. His body was never recovered. Sgt. Stillman ‘s name is engraved on a rampart in the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as ‘missing, presumed dead’ in France.

TENNISON, James William: regimental number 3317099, was drafted January 8, 1918. He was a labourer, living in Sebright. James was born in Hastings, in 1889, a son of George P. Tennison & Mary Ray, the 1901 census has him living in Rama, a stepson of William Docharty. Private Tennison, a member of the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, was killed in action, October 1, 1918 in the Battle of Cambrai. He is buried in the Canada Cemetery, (Tilloy-les-Cambrai), grave I.D.5: His name appears on a cenotaph in the Sebright cemetery, along with the name of two others from the Sebright area. The stone reads ” Greater love hath no man than his that a man lay down his life for his friend.”

(Tilloy-les-Cambrai is a village on the north-western outskirts of the town of Cambrai and a little east of the road to Douai. The village of Tilloy was captured by the Canadian Corps at the beginning of October 1918 in the face of strong opposition, and the cemetery was made by their burial officer on 13 October. Canada Cemetery contains mostly Canadian burials.
Casualty Details: UK 6, Canada 255, Unidentified 4, Total Burials: 265)

WILLIAMS, William John : regimental number 643981, enlisted in the 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, Feb. 2, 1916. He was single, 26, a woodworker, living in Orillia. Born in Simcoe County, in 1889, a son of Joseph Williams & Ruth Ann Doherty, who were living in Rama (Longford Mills), when William enlisted. Pte. Williams arrived in England, October 28, 1916, and joined the 116th Battalion, March 20, 1917. He was killed in action, August 8, 1918, in the attack on Hamon Wood. He is buried in the Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Domart-Sur-La- Luce, Somme, France.

(Domart-sur-la-Luce is a village and commune in the Department of the Somme, in the valley of the Luce, on the road from Amiens to Roye. Hourges is a hamlet on the same road, a little south-east of the village and Hourges Orchard Cemetery is on the south-west side of the road.
Historical Information: The neighbourhood saw fighting on 1 April 1918, when the 2nd Cavalry Division (including the Canadian Cavalry Brigade) took “Rifle Wood”, and again on 8 August 1918, when the 43rd Canadian Battalion retook the same wood and the Canadian Corps swept forward more than 9 kilometres. Hourges Orchard Cemetery was made in August 1918, although two graves of April 1918 were brought in after the Armistice. The cemetery contains 144 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 11 of the burials are unidentified but a special memorial commemorates one casualty known to be buried among them. )

The following soldiers died shortly after their return to Canada from War related a

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Website Exec.


Submission Committee:
Frances Laver
Lisa Burke
Fred Lamb
Mike Crosby


Content:
P.D.McNamee

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