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Home » Photos » Rama Mara Photos » "Ramara Military" » World War I Veterans
Captain John Donald Glover, M.I.D.
Captain John Donald Glover, M.I.D.
He enlisted the day the war was declared, Aug. 4, 1914. Born in Mara, in the Gamebridge area, in 1889, a son of William Glover & Mary McRae. Captain Glover was killed in action, April 23, 1915, at Langemarck, Belgium. He was survived by his wife and two children. He was mentioned in dispatches,( M.I.D.) His name appears on panel 18-24-26-30, in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. A family marker in the Gamebridge Cemetery, honours his sacrifice for our country, as does the Mara Twp. Cenotaph. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Sergeant Norman Glover, K.I.A.
Sergeant Norman Glover, K.I.A.
Like his brother John, he enlisted the day war was declared, Aug. 4, 1914. At the time he was living in Calgary, he was born in Mara (Gamebridge), a son of William Glover & Mary McRae. Sergeant Glover was killed in action, the same day as his brother John, April 23, 1915, in the same battle as his brother, at Langemarck, Belgium. His name appears in the Menin Gate(Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. Also on the Glover family grave marker in the Gamebridge Cemetery. The Mara Twp. Cenotaph, honours his sacrifice too. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Lieut. McCorkell
Lieut. McCorkell
James Ignatius McCorkell was a school teacher in Mara S.S. # 5, prior to enlisting in the 116th Bn. While in training he was in charge of recruiting in Mara Twp. Born in Mara in 1895, a son of Patrick J. McCorkell & Mary O'Donnell. He was married to Cecilla Proctor of Beaverton. He was killed in action, Aug. 12, 1918, and buried in Somme, France. His name is listed on the Mara Twp. Cenotaph. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Sergeant Donald (Dan) McLean M.M.
Sergeant Donald (Dan) McLean M.M.
A son of Alexander McLean & Margaret Robert MacDonald, he was born in Mara, in 1888. Known as Dan, he enlisted in the 157th Simcoe Foresters, Feb. 1, 1916. He died of wounds, in an English Hospital Jan. 18, 1918, and was buried in Ingham England. Dan was awarded a Military Medal, (MM) for bravery in the field. In June of 1919, his body was returned to Canada, and laid to rest in the St. Andrew's/ St. James Cemetery in Orillia. His brother George also enlisted in the CEF. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
William Chester Barnes--Dog Tag
William Chester Barnes--Dog Tag
Lance Corporal- William Chester Barnes- was killed in action, 1 Oct. 1918, by enemy machine gun fire. (see Those who made the Supreme Sacrifice--Veterans Secion) This 'dog-tag' was returned to his family.
Lance Corporal  William Chester Barnes
Lance Corporal William Chester Barnes
was killed in action, 1 Oct.. 1918- he is bured in the British Cemetery, Sancourt, France. This is an identifacion tag.
English Medal to Dead Canadians
English Medal to Dead Canadians
William Chester Barnes was killed in action--(see Those who made the Supreme Sacrifice) During WW1,the British Government issued a Memorial Plaque, to the relatives of fallen soldiers as a token of their appreciation. These plaques are commonly called a 'Dead Man's Penny' as the design resembled a British Penny-- some family members resented the plaque, as they felt their loved one's liife was worhty of something more than a plaque, that looked like a penny.
Pte. Percy EDWARDS
Pte. Percy EDWARDS
Family memorial, in St. George's Lake, St Paul's Anglican Cemetery, Washago.
Pte. John THOMSON
Pte. John THOMSON
Pte. Thomson, enlisted on October 30, 1915. After the war he returned to Gamebridge, and in 1923, he married Florence Dixon, of Gamebridge. this marker in the Knox Presbyterian Cemetery in Gamebrige, honours his service for King & Country.
Sergeant Peter Kelly's Medaille Militaire
Sergeant Peter Kelly's Medaille Militaire
The Médaille militaire (English: Military Medal) is a military decoration of the French Republic first established in 1852 by Emperor Napoleon III for award to privates and non-commissioned officers who distinguished themselves by acts of bravery in action against an enemy force. Sgt. Kelly was presented this Medal by the French Government, while in the C.E.F., however he never told his famliy why.
Pte. William Robert KELLY
Pte. William Robert KELLY
KELLY, William Robert : regimental number 262846, enlisted in the 209th Battalion, in Vanguard Saskatchewan. He was single, 33, a painter living in Aneroid, Saskatchewan. Born in Mara (Brechin), in 1883, a son of William Kelly & Agnes Buchanan. He died in Regina in 1919. of a war related illness. The stone on the family plot in the Gamebridge Cemetery, honours his service for King & Country.
Washago Detachment CEF WW1
Washago Detachment CEF WW1
Washago area Soldiers enlisted in the 182nd, Ontario County Battalion.
Rama
Rama
Rama Road, Monument, reconizing members of the community who served in WW1, WW2, and the Korea War
Rama- Soldiers
Rama- Soldiers
Monument along Rama Road recognizes those from the community who served in WW1
Captain Martin Hugh Roach
Captain Martin Hugh Roach
Martin served as a Captain in the 116th Ontario Battalion. After the war he set up his practice as a Lawyer in Beaverton.
Sgt. Earl Lefebvre
Sgt. Earl Lefebvre
at the age of 17, he enlisted in the 58th Battalion, Aug. 27, 1915. He was born in Rama Twp. (Longford Mills) in 1898, a son of Hormidas Lefebvre & Philomene Gaudaur.
Pte. Henry Fountain-World War 1 KIA
Pte. Henry Fountain-World War 1 KIA
Henry, was a son of Joseph Fountain & Annie Boyle, of Uptergrove. He served in the 54th Bn. and was killed in action, Sept. 27, 1918, at the age of 21. He is buried in Bourlon Wood Cemetery, France. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Pte. Charles Roy MacKENZIE,
Pte. Charles Roy MacKENZIE,
a son of John R. MacKenzie & Elizabeth Smith, he died of pneumonia, 25 Jan. 1915, and is buried in the Netheravon (All Saints) Churchyard, Wiltshire, United Kingdom.
Pte. Charles Roy MacKenzie- 48th Highlander
Pte. Charles Roy MacKenzie- 48th Highlander
MacKENZIE, Charles Roy : regimental number 27519, enlisted September 18, 1914, in the 15th (48th Highlanders) Battalion, he reported directly to the Valcartier training camp in Quebec. Private MacKenzie was single, 22, a Construction Foreman. Born in Beaverton, in 1891, a son of John R. MacKenzie & Elizabeth Smith. He died of pneumonia, on January 26, 1915, and is buried in the Netheravon (All Saints) Churchyard, Wiltshire, United Kingdom. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
Sergt. Donald McLEAN-- M.M.
Sergt. Donald McLEAN-- M.M.
Family stone- St. Andrews, St. James Cemetery, Orillia. McLEAN, Donald(Dan) M.M.:regimental number 643928, enlisted in the 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, Feb. 1, 1916. He was single, 27, living in Orillia, working as a fur cutter. Sergeant McLean, was born in Mara, a son of Alexander McLean & Margaret Robert MacDonald. He arrived in England, Oct. 28, 1916, and joined the 116th Bn. in France, March 8, 1917. In the July 22, 1917, Raid, by the 116th, Corp. Dan McLean showed great leadership, he lead his men to their objective, inflicted heavy casualties and personally captured an officer and five men, all of this in face of heavy shelling and machine gun fire. For this Corp. McLean was awarded the Military Medal (MM) for bravery in the field. The Nov. 15, 1917, Orillia Times, reported "Sergt. Dan McLean is reported wounded in the heel with shrapnel, Nov. 3., at Passchendaele". On December 27, 1917, his foot was amputated, and the early indications were he was getting along well. He died of wounds in an English hospital January 18, 1918, and was buried in the cemetery of Ingham, Sulfolk. He was survived by his mother, three brothers and three sisters, Robert, Moose Jaw, Sask.; Neil, Duluth, Mich.; Capt. George McLean, B.A., of the 21st Northumberland Fusileers, B.E.F.; Miss Tena McLean, Houghton, Mich.; Miss Margaret and Mrs. F.H. Horne, Orillia. In June of 1919, his remains had been brought back to Orillia and were laid to rest in the family plot in St. Andrew's, St. James Cemetery.
Milton Clarke --92nd Battalion Cap Badge
Milton Clarke --92nd Battalion Cap Badge
Milton Clarke was killed in action, 1 Dec. 1916. this is a photo of his Cap Badge- of the 92nd (48th Highlanders) Battalion. Overseas he was transferred to the 13th Battalion, known as the BLACK WATCH.
Milton Clarke --Highlander Falcon
Milton Clarke --Highlander Falcon
This Falcon is worn on the collar of the Highlander blue patrol tunic, as well as on the DU tunic. Some falcons are brass, some (more shiny) are brass coloured white metal, while others are gold plated, or even gold.
Regimental gift from Mara citizens
Regimental gift from Mara citizens
182nd (Ontario County) Battalion, is the regiment the citizens of Mara purchased a truck for in 1916. This was the second Battalion raised in Ontario County, ((1st 116th). The citizens of Mara reached in their pockets and collected $472 to cover the cost of this truck. The Atherley Patrotic Auxillary held a tag sale, and raised $100, the Brechin Patrotic Auxillary contributed $50, while the balance was donated directly in amounts ranging from $25 to fifty cents, from those who had son's or relatives serving. --source Orillia TIMES, Aug. 3, 1916. ---Photo courtesy of the Whitby Archieves.
Milton Clarke--92nd Batt. Sweetheart Pin
Milton Clarke--92nd Batt. Sweetheart Pin
Very rare- in fact, a Curator at the 48th Highlanders Museum,in Toronto, has never seen one for the 92nd Battalion- these enamel painted pins, were often made for the Soldier to give to a loved one.
A. Bethune & M. CLARKE / Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calis, France
A. Bethune & M. CLARKE / Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calis, France
Private Angus Joseph Bethune, of Rama is buried here, he was killed in action, 18 Nov. 1917. Also, Signaller Milton Clarke, who was killed in action, July 23, 1917. This cemetery was begun by the French but was used by Commonwealth divisions and field ambulances from the time they took over this part of the front in July 1916 until September 1918. It is associated particularly with the Canadian Corps whose headquarters were nearby and many of the graves in Plots V to X date from April 1917 and the Battle of Vimy Ridge. After the Armistice, a few graves were brought in from isolated positions in the neighbourhood and in June 1923, the French graves were removed, the great majority to Notre Dame-de-Lorette French National Cemetery. Villers Station Cemetery now contains 1,208 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 32 German war graves. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.
Veron Clarke- 116th Battalion Sweetheart Pin
Veron Clarke- 116th Battalion Sweetheart Pin
This is a Sweetheart pin, often given to wifes, girlfreinds, or Mothers. They were ussually made by local jewelers, so it is hard to track down how many were made, or when. This is an unussual design. A researcher at the Oshawa Military Museum, advises he has only seen one similiar, but the flag was different-- this flag is a pre-1917 Red Ensign of Canada.
Pte. Alexander Smith MORTON
Pte. Alexander Smith MORTON
Grave marker of Pte. Alexander Smith Morton, visited by his brother-in-law William Wendell Holmes and his sister Helen Hamilton Morton, (Mrs. W. Holmes. circa 1950
Vern Clarke WW1
Vern Clarke WW1
Vernon Lealy Clarke, enlisted with 116th Ontario County Battalion, a son of Charles William Clarke & Daisy Dean Leake. His brother Milton was killed in action.
Chester Barnes / Sancourt British Cemetery, Nord, France
Chester Barnes / Sancourt British Cemetery, Nord, France
Lance Corporal William Chester Barnes, is buried here, he was K.I.A. Oct. 1, 1918. Sancourt village was captured by the Canadian Corps on the 29th September 1918. The British Cemetery was made in October 1918. There are now over 200, 1914-18 war casualties commemorated in this site. Of these, 20 are unidentified. The cemetery covers an area of 634 square metres and is enclosed by a rubble wall. Cick and paste http://www.inmemories.com:80/Cemeteries/sancourtbrit.htm
Cpl. Russell Stewart MacDonald article- K.I.A
Cpl. Russell Stewart MacDonald article- K.I.A
Born in Mara in 7 Aug. 1891, as son of Donald (Daniel) C McDONALD and Elizabeth STEWART. He was a medical student at Queen's University, when he enlisted in the 50th Queen's Battery, Nov. 2, 1915. Overseas he was farrier with the Canadian Field Artillery. Cpl. MacDONLAD was killed in action, Oct, 24, 1917. He is buried Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium, grave IV. B. 7. NOTE- the article erroneously indicates his father is James, also, Russsell signed his name MACDONALD, while his father and siblings went by MCDONALD.
BETSKO, CARTWRIGHT,DOLAN, GLOVER, KING, STAMP/Ypres(MENIN GATE) Memorial, Belgium
BETSKO, CARTWRIGHT,DOLAN, GLOVER, KING, STAMP/Ypres(MENIN GATE) Memorial, Belgium
Inscribed on the wall are the names of 54,000 officers and soldiers who have no known grave. Soldiers from Rama & Mara include, MATVEI (MIKE) BETSKO, LIONEL CARTWRIGHT, WILLIAM JOSEPH DOLAN, JOHN DONALD GLOVER, NORMAN ROBERT GLOVER, WILLIAM KING, & THOMAS HERBERT STAMP The Menin Gate is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used by either side and the violence of the attack forced an Allied withdrawal and a shortening of the line of defence. There was little more significant activity on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele. The German offensive of March 1918 met with some initial success, but was eventually checked and repulsed in a combined effort by the Allies in September. The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations, except New Zealand, who died in the Salient, in the case of United Kingdom casualties before 16 August 1917 (with some exceptions). Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. Other New Zealand casualties are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery. The YPRES (MENIN GATE) MEMORIAL now bears the names of more than 54,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield with sculpture by Sir William Reid-Dick, was unveiled by Lord Plumer on 24 July 1927.
Geogre Clarke Family Album (Brechin Merchant)
Geogre Clarke Family Album (Brechin Merchant)
BLACK, CARRICK,CONGDON, EDWARDS, GOWANLOCK, KELLY,STILLMAN M.M./VIMY RIDGE MEMORIAL, FRANCE
BLACK, CARRICK,CONGDON, EDWARDS, GOWANLOCK, KELLY,STILLMAN M.M./VIMY RIDGE MEMORIAL, FRANCE
This memorial lists the name of 11,000 Canadians, with no known grave. The following soldiers from Rama & Mara are included in this list; THOMAS HOWARD BLACK, THOMAS CARRICK, ORREN JOHN CONGDON, PERCY EDWARDS, ROBERT GEORGE GOWANLOCK, ALPHONSE PATRICK KELLY, FRED STILLMAN M.M., The Vimy Memorial overlooks the Douai Plain from the highest point of Vimy Ridge, about eight kilometers northeast of Arras on the N17 towards Lens. The memorial is well sign-posted from this road to the left, just before you enter the village of Vimy from the south. On the opening day of the Battle of Arras, 9 April 1917, the four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting side by side for the first time, scored a huge tactical victory in the capture of the 60 metre high Vimy Ridge. After the war, the highest point of the ridge was chosen as the site of the great memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the First World War, and particularly to the 60,000 who gave their lives in France. It also bears the names of 11,000 Canadian servicemen who died in France - many of them in the fight for Vimy Ridge - who have no known grave. The memorial was designed by W. S. Allward.
Trench Picture --Very Rare--Milton Clarke on right
Trench Picture --Very Rare--Milton Clarke on right
member of the 13th Bn. Black Watch. Signaller Clarke was killed in action, 1 Dec. , 1916, and is buried in the Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calis, France. see 'those who made the Supreme Sacrifice' in the VETERANS section.
Robert Campbell/Dominion Cemetery, Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt, France
Robert Campbell/Dominion Cemetery, Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt, France
Private Robert Alexander Campbell, was K.I.A. Sep. 13. 1918, and is buried in the Dominion Cemetery. Hendecourt-les-Cagnicourt was captured by the 57th (West Lancashire) and 52nd (Lowland) Division on the night of the 1st-2nd September, 1918. Dominion Cemetery was made by Canadian units in September, 1918, after the storming by the Canadian Corps of the Drocourt-Queant Line; Imperial Cemetery, to the West of the village, has now been removed to H.A.C. Cemetery, Ecoust-St. Mein. The grave of one Canadian airman was brought in after the Armistice from an isolated position some kilometres to the East.
Cpl. Russell Stewart MacDonald , K.I.A.
Cpl. Russell Stewart MacDonald , K.I.A.
Born in Mara in 7 Aug. 1891, as son of Donald (Daniel) C McDONALD and Elizabeth STEWART. He was a medical student at Queen's University, when he enlisted in the 50th Queen's Battery, Nov. 2, 1915. Overseas he was farrier with the Canadian Field Artillery. Cpl. MacDONLAD was killed in action, Oct, 24, 1917. He is buried Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium, grave IV. B. 7. Note: Russell signed his name as MACDONALD, while his father and siblings went by MCDONLAD. see 'those who made the supreme sacriface' in the Veterans section under Active Topics on the homepage.
Pte. Ernest CARRICK- Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England
Pte. Ernest CARRICK- Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England
died Sept. 8, 1916, from battle wounds incurred in Somme, France. He is buried in the Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England.
Francis H. CLARKE /Grayshott (St. Joseph) R.C. Churchyard, Hampshire, England
Francis H. CLARKE /Grayshott (St. Joseph) R.C. Churchyard, Hampshire, England
Pte. Francis Henry Clarke, died of pneumonia, Feb. 12, 1919, in the Bramshot Hospital, England, and is buried in St. Joseph R.C. Cemetery, Grayshott, England. During the two world wars, the United Kingdom became an island fortress used for training troops and launching land, sea and air operations around the globe. There are more than 170,000 Commonwealth war graves in the United Kingdom, many being those of servicemen and women killed on active service, or who later succumbed to wounds. Others died in training accidents, or because of sickness or disease. The graves, many of them privately owned and marked by private memorials, will be found in more than 12,000 cemeteries and churchyards. From the autumn of 1915, to October 1919, a Canadian Training Centre was placed in the open country on both sides of the Portsmouth road, between the turnings to Grayshott and to Bramshot. The soldiers who died in No. 12 Canadian General Hospital, which served the camp, were buried in Bramshott Churchyard or (in case of the Roman Catholic soldiers) in the Churchyard of St. Joseph's Church, at Grayshott. The churchyard now contains the graves of 95 Canadian servicemen of the First World War.
Arthur Dissette
Arthur Dissette
Killed in Action over France WWI Obituary: Flight Lieut. Arthur C. Dissette - Buried in Union Jack, On Return from Raid, Fatal Accident Occurred. Details of how Flight-Lieut. Arthur C. Dissette met his death are given in a letter from one of his companions, to Mr. Richard Dissette. The writer stated that Lieut. Dissette and two other aviators had been on a raid when the fatal accident occurred. He told of seeing Lieut Dissette's machine hit trouble and "spinning in the clouds." A message was received from a neighboring aerodrome stating that his body had been found and that the aviator had been instantly killed. The body was placed in a casket, wrapped in the Union Jack and buried. A large propeller, emblematic of the Naval Air Service, marks the grave. Obituary: Flight-Lieut. Arthur C. Dissette, R.N.A.S. has given his life for his country. A cable was received by his brother, Mr. Frank Dissette of the Hotel St. Charles yesterday, briefly stating that he had been killed while on escort duty. A clean, clever, athlete, a gentleman always, he will be mourned by all who knew him. He was thirty years of age, and was educated at Loyola University, Montreal; Technical School, Toronto and the University of Toronto. After finishing his education he located in Vancouver, where he was engaged in the automobile business. He enlisted shortly after the outbreak of the war and after a course of training in England, was sent to France. He was probably one of the first Canadians entrusted with the British "Bullet", an airplane capable of a speed of over one hundred miles an hour. During his stay in France he was sent, with other aviators on night raids in munition plants and was also engaged in the aerial fighting in the Somme section. He took part in some of the most thrilling aerial conflicts recorded since the outbreak of the war and distinguished himself singally. Not long ago he was with "Pete" Flett, former Argonaut halfback, recently decorated and "Sport" Murtoo, who has been reported missing. On that occasion all three had a narrow escape from death at the hands of Hun aviators. No word has been received of Murtoo since that flight. While no details as the manner of his death have been received, it is certain that Flight-Lieut. Arthur Dissette made the supreme sacrifice and passed into the great beyond courageously doing his part in the present struggle for the preservation of civilization, justice and liberty.
A.CURRAN- Villers-Bretonneux Cemetery, Somme, France
A.CURRAN- Villers-Bretonneux Cemetery, Somme, France
Pte. Arnold CURRAN, was wounded aug. 8, 1918, at the battle of Amiens, he died from these wounds Aug. 11, 1918, and was eventually buried here. This cemetery is a concentration cemetery, being created after the Armistice of November 1918 by bringing together graves and remains from the nearby battlefields and from several military burial grounds in the area. A total number of 2,142 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War are buried or commemorated here. Of this number, 609 of the burials are unidentified. It is believed that five soldiers are buried among these unidentified graves and there are special memorials to them. There are also special memorials to 15 men who were buried in other cemeteries before the Armistice and their graves could not be found when those burial sites were examined for removing the graves to this place.
Telegram 1914 for Arthur Dissette
Telegram 1914 for Arthur Dissette
H. FOUNTAIN / Bourlon Wood Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
H. FOUNTAIN / Bourlon Wood Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Pte. Henry Fountain was killed in action, Sept. 27, 1918, he is buried in this cemetery. Bourlon is a village approximately 6 kilometres west of Cambrai. It lies between the main Cambrai to Bapaume road (N30) and the Cambrai to Arras road (D939). The cemetery is signposted from the centre of the village as is the Canadian Forces Memorial. On its South-East side, stretching nearly to Fontaine-Notre Dame, is Bourlon Wood, and the village and the wood were the scene of desperate fighting in the Battle of Cambrai 1917; the 40th Division, which with the Guards and the 62nd Division bore the brunt of this fighting, has placed a memorial altar in Bourlon Church. At the end of the Battle the British troops were withdrawn from Bourlon, and the wood and the village were ultimately retaken by the 3rd Canadian and 4th Canadian Divisions on the 27th September 1918. The village was later "adopted" by the Borough of Hove. Bourlon Wood Cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps Burial Officer in October 1918. Three Chinese labourers were buried in it in 1919, and later five graves from the battlefields were brought into Plot II, Row F.
Pte. Alex Morton, K.I.A.
Pte. Alex Morton, K.I.A.
Alexander Smith Morton, was born in Longford Mills, in 1895, a son of James Morton & Janet McGill. At the age of 21, he was killed in action, in France, October 28, 1916, while with the 48th Highlanders, 15th Battalion. He had one brother and six sisters. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Milton Clarke--K.I.A. 1916
Milton Clarke--K.I.A. 1916
Signaller Clarke, a son of Charles William CLarke & Daisy Dean Leake, was killed in action 1 Dec. 1916. He is buried in the Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calis, France. See 'those who made the Supreme Sacrifice' in the VETERANS section.
S. GINSBERG / La Targette British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
S. GINSBERG / La Targette British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Samuel GINSBERG, of Brechin, was K.I.A. May 3, 1917, he is buried in this cemetery. La Targette British Cemetery, formerly known as Aux-Rietz Military Cemetery, was begun at the end of April 1917 and used by field ambulances and fighting units until September 1918. Nearly a third of the graves have an artillery connection; in March-April 1917, the artillery of the 2nd Canadian and 5th Divisions, and certain heavy artillery units, had their headquarters in a deep cave at Aux-Rietz. Sixteen graves were brought into the cemetery from the immediate neighbourhood after the Armistice. The cemetery contains 638 First World War burials, 41 of them unidentified. There are also three Second World War burials, two of which are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.
Pte. Percy Edwards, K.I.A.
Pte. Percy Edwards, K.I.A.
Percy and his twin brother Roy, enlisted in the 157th Battalion, Jan. 26, 1916. While with the 21st Battalion, he was reported missiing, presumed dead, Sept. 15, 1916. He was raised in Rama, (Longford Mills), a son of Edward Edwards & Alice Lina Howe. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Pte. William Joseph Dolan, K.I.A.
Pte. William Joseph Dolan, K.I.A.
was killed in action October 30, 1917, in the Battle of Passchendaele. The youngest son of Patrick Dolan & Mary Jane Clarke, survived by three brothers, Martin in Winnipeg, Jerry in Chicago, and James of Toronto, also serving overseas. Photo from Orillia Times, 27 Dec. 1917. See 'THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE' in the Veterans section, under Active Topics on the homepage.
Signaller Milton Clarke, K.I.A.
Signaller Milton Clarke, K.I.A.
Milton, was born in Burks Falls, in 1896, his family came to Brechin to operate a Hardware store, owned by his late grandfather. A son of William Charles Clarke & Daisey Dean Leake. After training sometime in England as a Signaller, he was assigned to the 13th Battalion, the Black Watch, he joined the unit in France, Nov.1, 1916- and was killed in action, Dec. 1, 1916, at the age of 20. -- his name appears on the Mara Twp. Cenotaph See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Milton Clarke article-
Milton Clarke article-
See 'THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE' in the Veterans section, under Active Topics on the homepage
Pte. Robert G. GOWANLOCK. K.I.A.
Pte. Robert G. GOWANLOCK. K.I.A.
GOWANLOCK, Robert George : regimental number 602887, enlisted August 7, 1915, in the 34th Battalion. He was single, 29, a Farmer. Born in Saugeen Township, in Bruce County, in 1886, a son of Andrew Gowanlock & Elizabeth Laidlaw. He went overseas in the fall of 1915, and wounded in 1916, he also had trench fever, but recovered and joined the tunneling company. Private Gowanlock, was killed in action, August 18, 1917, in France. He was survived by three brothers, Wm. T. in Uhthoff, James in the 116th Battalion, and Douglas in Atherley, and one sister Mrs. Ross, in Toronto. His name is engraved on a panel in the Vimy Memorial, Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as 'missing, presumed dead' in France. His brother James was also killed in action, just 6 days later. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
Earl GORING article
Earl GORING article
See 'THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE' in the Veterans section, under Active Topics on the homepage
Pte. James Laidlaw GOWANLOCK- K.I.A.
Pte. James Laidlaw GOWANLOCK- K.I.A.
GOWANLOCK, James Laidlaw : regimental number 643833, enlisted in the 157th (Simcoe Foresters) Battalion, January 26, 1916. He was 27, single, a Farmer, living in Orillia, the 1911 census indicates he was a Domestic, on the Robert Leith farm, in Mara. Born in Bruce County, in 1888, a son of Andrew Gowanlock & Elizabeth Laidlaw, his next of kin was his brother Douglas of Mara (Uptergrove). Overseas, he was transferred to the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, and was killed in action, August 24, 1917, at Fosse 10, France. He is buried in the Aix-Noulette Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Grave I.L.13. His brother Robert was killed in action 6 days earlier. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
Smith Family Grave Marker- George & Hardy
Smith Family Grave Marker- George & Hardy
The Smith Family stone in the Longford Mills United Church Cemetery. The north side reads: also their sons killed in action in France. George Henry Sept 20 1915 age 29 years/ Hardy Alfred Sept. 30, 1918 age 22 years/ FOR KING AND COUNTRY See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Pte. Earl GORING
Pte. Earl GORING
Was killed in action, Nov. 15, 1917. He was a son of Edgar Goring & Idella Barager, of Rama. See 'THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE' in the Veterans section, under Active Topics on the homepage
James GOWANLOCK / Aix Noulette Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
James GOWANLOCK / Aix Noulette Communal Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Pte. James Laidlaw GOWANLOK, K.I.A. Aug.. 24, 1917, is buried here. The Cemetery Extension was begun by French troops early in 1915, and the two French plots are next to the Communal Cemetery. It was taken over by the 1st and 2nd Divisions in February, 1916, and used by fighting units and Field Ambulances until October, 1918. It was increased after the Armistice by the concentration of graves from the battlefields to the East. There are now 749 Commonwealth burials of the 1914-1918 war commemorated here, 61 being unidentified. There are also 502 French burials here. The cemetery covers an area of 5,198 square metres and is enclosed by a red brick wall on three sides, and on the South by the wall of the Communal Cemete
E. GORING--Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium
E. GORING--Vlamertinghe New Military Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium
Earl GORING, of Rama Portage, while carrying a wounded Officer,a bursting shell killed both of them, Nov. 15, 1917. He is buried in this cemetery. For much of the First World War, Vlamertinghe (now Vlamertinge) was just outside the normal range of German shell fire and the village was used both by artillery units and field ambulances. Burials were made in the original Military Cemetery until June 1917, when the New Military Cemetery was begun in anticipation of the Allied offensive launched on this part of the front in July. Although the cemetery continued in use until October 1918, most of the burials are from July to December 1917. The cemetery now contains 1,813 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.
Pte. Earl GORRING-article
Pte. Earl GORRING-article
article from the Orillia Times, 22 Nov.,1917.
Charles A. GRAY / Puchevillers British Cemetry, Somme, France
Charles A. GRAY / Puchevillers British Cemetry, Somme, France
Private Charles Alexander Gray, son of Henry Gray & Marion Edwards Ried, of Rama. He was wounded in the Battle of Somme, and died from these wounds Sept. 15, 1916. He is buried in this cemetery. Grave IV. C. 45. Puchevillers British Cemetery, Somme, France. In June 1916, just before the opening of the Battles of the Somme, the 3rd and 44th Casualty Clearing Stations came to Puchevillers. Plots I to V, and almost the whole of Plot VI, were made by those hospitals before the end of March 1917. For the next two months the 2nd/1st South Midland Casualty Clearing Station used the cemetery. Plot VII contains for the most part the graves of men who died in the German advance in 1918, many of whom were buried by the 49th Clearing Station in March 1918, or by the 48th Labour Group in August. Puchevillers British Cemetery contains 1,763 First World
Lance-Corporal Fred I. Taylor-Washago
Lance-Corporal Fred I. Taylor-Washago
LANCE-CORPORAL FRED I. TAYLOR Son of the Rev. E. B. Taylor, of Allandale, formerly of Washago. Killed in Action. Corporal Taylor was for some years a resident of Orillia.
Pte. William J. DOLAN- article
Pte. William J. DOLAN- article
note, this article actually appeared in the Nov. 17, 1917 issue of the Orillia Times.
Robert E. JUFFS / Hangard Communal Cemetery, Somme, France
Robert E. JUFFS / Hangard Communal Cemetery, Somme, France
Private Robert Ernest JUFFS, was killed in action, Aug. 8, 1918, in the Battle of Amiens, and is buried in this cemetery. At the end of March 1918, Hangard was at the junction of the French and Commonwealth forces defending Amiens. From 4 to 25 April, the village and Hangard Wood were the scene of incessant fighting, in which the line was held and the 18th Division were particularly heavily engaged. On 8 August, the village was cleared by the 1st and 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles. The original extension to the communal cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps in August 1918. It consisted of 51 graves in the present Plot I. It was greatly increased after the Armistice when graves were brought in, mainly from the battlefields of Hangard and Hangard Wood and from the following smaller cemeteries :-
Lieut. N. C. Kenny-Fern Cottage
Lieut. N. C. Kenny-Fern Cottage
LIEUT. N. C. KENNY Eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Kenny, Fern Cottage. Killed in action on May 18th. Enlisted at Victoria, B. C.
David McKENZIE /Aldershot Military Cemetery, Hampshire, England
David McKENZIE /Aldershot Military Cemetery, Hampshire, England
Soon after David arrived in England, he became ill, and died of natural causes, Aug. 23, 1918. He is buried in the Aldershot Millitary Cemetery. During both wars, numerous regimental and corps depots were based in and around Aldershot. At the outbreak of The First World War, if was the headquarters of the Aldershot Command and of the 1st and 2nd Divisions, and the Depot of the Royal Army Medical Corps. The North and South Camps, divided by the Basingstoke Canal, remained in full activity throughout the War. During the Second World War, some 400,000 Canadian servicemen were trained there. Aldershot Military Cemetery is a permanent military cemetery, the property of the Ministry of Defence. The Commission is responsible for the care of graves of both world wars within the cemetery. There are 690 First World War graves in the cemetery, the earliest bears the date 5th August 1914, and the latest 11th August 1921. Many of these graves are in plot AF. The 129 Second World War graves are in groups in various plots, the largest group in plot A containing 86 graves.
Private (Harry) George Henry Smith-Longford Mills
Private (Harry) George Henry Smith-Longford Mills
PRIVATE George Henry (HARRY) SMITH Son of Mr. & Mrs. Issac Smith, Killed in Action on Sept. 25, 1916. He is buried in the Adnac Military Cemetery, Somme, France. a marker also exists in the Longford Mills Cemetery. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Private Wm. A. Wallace-Gamebridge
Private Wm. A. Wallace-Gamebridge
PRIVATE WM. A. WALLACE Son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Wallace, Gamebridge, who was killed in action on October 8th. He enlisted in the 76th Battalion and spent last winter in Orillia. He was only 17 years of age. Besides his parents, two brothers and six sisters survive. He is a nephew of Mrs. B. W. Danton, Barrie-road. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Trooper Herbert Stamp-Longford Mills
Trooper Herbert Stamp-Longford Mills
TROOPER HERBERT STAMP Missing since June 2. His parents live at Longford Mills, but he was well known in town, and enlisted here, with the Orillia troop in the C.M.R. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
 Lt. James I. McCORKELL /Bouchoir New Brititish Cemetery, Somme, France
Lt. James I. McCORKELL /Bouchoir New Brititish Cemetery, Somme, France
Lieutenant James Ingatius McCorkell, was killed in action, Aug. 12, 1918. He is buried in this cemetery. The village of Bouchoir passed into German hands on 27 March 1918 but was recovered by the 8th Canadian Infantry Brigade on 9 August 1918. The New British Cemetery was made after the Armistice when graves were brought there from several small Commonwealth cemeteries and from the battlefields round Bouchoir and south of the village. Almost all date from March, April or August 1918 The cemetery now contains 763 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 231 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to five casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Another special memorial commemorates an airman buried in Laboissiere German Cemetery whose grave could not be found
Lt. McCorkell. gravemarker/ Bouchoir New British Cemetery, Somme, France
Lt. McCorkell. gravemarker/ Bouchoir New British Cemetery, Somme, France
this headstone, marks the grave of Lieutenant James Ignatius McCorkell, in the Bouchoir New British Cemetery, in Somme, France.
Russel McCUAIG / Abbeville Communal Cemetery, Somme, France
Russel McCUAIG / Abbeville Communal Cemetery, Somme, France
Pte. McCuaig, a member of the Canadian Machine Gun Corps., 4th Division, was wounded in the Battle of Cambrai. He died from this wounds, sept. 26, 1918, and is buried in this cemetery. For much of the First World War, Abbeville was headquarters of the Commonwealth lines of communication and No.3 BRCS, No.5 and No.2 Stationary Hospitals were stationed there variously from October 1914 to January 1920. The communal cemetery was used for burials from November 1914 to September 1916, the earliest being made among the French military graves. The extension was begun in September 1916
Congdon- letter from Colonel
Congdon- letter from Colonel
A LETTER FROM THE COMMANING OFFICER OF THE 116TH BATTALION, PUBLISHED IN THE ORILLIA TIMES, JAN 17, 1918 See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage-- Letter has been transcribed.
Sergt. Dan McLean M.M.- article
Sergt. Dan McLean M.M.- article
from the Orillia Times, Jan 24,1918 See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Gnr. Lee MERKLEY / Anzin-St. Aubin British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Gnr. Lee MERKLEY / Anzin-St. Aubin British Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France
Gnr. Lee Merkley was killed in action, Apr. 10, 1918, and buried in this cemetery.
Pte. Robert G. GOWANLOCK- article
Pte. Robert G. GOWANLOCK- article
article appeared in the Orillia Times, Aug. 30, 1917.
Alex. MORTON / Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Pas de Calias, France
Alex. MORTON / Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Pas de Calias, France
Pte. Alexander Smith MORTON, was K.I.A., Oct. 28, 1916, he is buried in the Cabaret Rouge British Cemetry, in France. On 26 September 1915, Souchez was taken from the Germans by French troops, who handed the sector over to Commonwealth forces the following March. The village was completely destroyed. The "Cabaret Rouge" was a house on the main road about 1 kilometre south of the village, at a place called Le Corroy, near the cemetery. On the east side, opposite the cemetery, were dugouts used as battalion headquarters in 1916. The communication trenches ended here, including a very long one named from the Cabaret. The cemetery was begun by Commonwealth troops in March 1916, used until August 1917 (largely by the 47th (London) Division and the Canadian Corps) and - at intervals - until September 1918; these original burials are in Plots I to V inclusive. It was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when more than 7,000 graves were brought in from the battlefields of Arras and from 103 other burial grounds in the Nord and the Pas-de-Calais. The cemetery now contains 7,655 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, more than half of them unidentified.
George PARKIN /Albert Communal Cemetery, Somme, France
George PARKIN /Albert Communal Cemetery, Somme, France
George Richard Parkin, died of wounds, Sept. 16. 1916, and is buried in the Albert Cemetery. Albert was held by French forces against the German advance on the Somme in September 1914. It passed into British hands in the summer of 1915; and the first fighting in July 1916, is known as the Battle of Albert, 1916. It was captured by the Germans on the 26th April 1918, and before its recapture by the 8th East Surreys on the following 22nd August (in the Battle of Albert, 1918,) it had been completely destroyed by artillery fire. The Extension was used by fighting units and Field Ambulances from August 1915 to November 1916, and more particularly in and after September 1916, when Field Ambulances were concentrated at Albert. From November 1916, the 5th Casualty Clearing Station used it for two months. From March 1917, it was not used (except for four burials in March, 1918) until the end of August 1918, when Plot II was made by the 18th Division. During the Second World War the extension was used again, when the French moved into it British casualties from isolated graves in and around Albert. There are now 862 First World War and 25 Second World War casualties commemorated in this site.
George ROGERS M.M. /Hagle Dump Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium
George ROGERS M.M. /Hagle Dump Cemetery, Ieper, Belgium
George ROGERS, a Home Child, lived with Hiram & Elizabeth Snodden, in Mara prior to enlisting Sept. 15, 1915. Overseas he was drafted into the 2nd. Canadain Mounted Rifles, and in July 1917, he was awarded the Military Medal (M.M.) for bravery in the field. He was wounded and reported missing Nov. 6, 1917. A grave marker bearing his name is in the Hagle Dump Cemetery. The cemetery at Hagle Dump was begun in April 1918, during the Battles of Lys. It was used by fighting units and field ambulances until the following October and was enlarged after the Armistice when more than 200 graves were brought into Plots III and IV from the battlefields of the Ypres Salient. Brielen Military Cemetery, from which 20 graves were brought to Hagle Dump, was used from April 1915 to September 1917. Hagle Dump Cemetery contains 437 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 140 of which are unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.
Staff-Sergt. F. O'LEARY M.M.
Staff-Sergt. F. O'LEARY M.M.
son of Timothy O'Leary & Elixabeth Murphy, born in Mara in 1890, was awared the Military Medal, for bravery in the field. Photo from the Orillia Times, May 2, 1918. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, under Active Topics, available on the home page.
John H. SHEFFIELD, / Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium
John H. SHEFFIELD, / Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium
Private Sheffield was killed in action, Nov. 17, 1917, and his final resting place is the Lijessenthoek Military Cemetery.
Staff-Sergt. F. O'LEARY M.M.
Staff-Sergt. F. O'LEARY M.M.
Article from the Orillia Times, April 17, 1918.
Geo. Henry FISHER-SMITH / Adanac Military Cemetery, Somme, France
Geo. Henry FISHER-SMITH / Adanac Military Cemetery, Somme, France
George Henry SMITH-FISHER, was killed in action Sept. 20, 1916. His final resting place is the Adanac Military Cemetery. The villages of Miraumont and Pys were occupied on 24-25 February 1917 following the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. They were retaken by the Germans on 25 March 1918, but recovered the 42nd (East Lancashire) Division on the following 24 August. Adanac Military Cemetery (the name was formed by reversing the name "Canada") was made after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the Canadian battlefields around Courcelette and small cemeteries surrounding Miraumont. There are now 3,186 Commonwealth burials and commemorations of the First World War in this cemetery. 1,708 of the burials are unidentified.
Gnr. Lee Merkley-article
Gnr. Lee Merkley-article
Posted in the Orillia Times, May 2, 1918
Hardy Alfred FISHER SMITH / St.Olle British Cemetery, Raillencourt, Nord, France
Hardy Alfred FISHER SMITH / St.Olle British Cemetery, Raillencourt, Nord, France
Hardy is one of the 97 interened in this cemertery, he was K.I.A. SEPT. 29, 1918, in the Battle of the Canal du Nord. St. Olle is a village in the Department of the Nord 1 kilometre west of Cambrai on the main road towards Arras. Raillencourt was carried by the Canadian Corps on the 28th and 29th September, 1918, in the Battle of the Canal du Nord. St. Olle British Cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps in October, 1918. Casualty Details: UK 1, Canada 96, Total Burials: 97
James William TENNISON- Gravemarker, Canada Cemetry-Tilloy-les-Cambrai, France
James William TENNISON- Gravemarker, Canada Cemetry-Tilloy-les-Cambrai, France
Private Tennison of Rama, was K.I.A. Oct. 1, 1918, in the Battle of Cambrai. He is buried in the Canada Cemetery, Tilloy-les-Cambrai. Tilloy-les-Cambrai is a village on the north-western outskirts of the town of Cambrai and a little east of the road to Douai. The village of Tilloy was captured by the Canadian Corps at the beginning of October 1918 in the face of strong opposition, and the cemetery was made by their burial officer on 13 October. Canada Cemetery contains mostly Canadian burials. Casualty Details: UK 6, Canada 255, Unidentified 4, Total Burials: 265
Wm. J. WILLIAMS /Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Domart-sur-la-Luce, Somme, France
Wm. J. WILLIAMS /Hourges Orchard Cemetery, Domart-sur-la-Luce, Somme, France
Pte. Williams was killed in the atttack on Hamon Woods, AUG. 8, 1918, and is buried in the Hourges Orchard Cemetery. Domart-sur-la-Luce is a village and commune in the Department of the Somme, in the valley of the Luce, on the road from Amiens to Roye. Hourges is a hamlet on the same road, a little south-east of the village and Hourges Orchard Cemetery is on the south-west side of the road. The neighbourhood saw fighting on 1 April 1918, when the 2nd Cavalry Division (including the Canadian Cavalry Brigade) took "Rifle Wood", and again on 8 August 1918, when the 43rd Canadian Battalion retook the same wood and the Canadian Corps swept forward more than 9 kilometres. Hourges Orchard Cemetery was made in August 1918, although two graves of April 1918 were brought in after the Armistice. The cemetery contains 144 burials and commemorations of the First World War. 11 of the burials are unidentified but a special memorial commemorates one casualty known to be buried among them.
Thomas Black, Vimy Memorial,  (names 11.000 without known graves)
Thomas Black, Vimy Memorial, (names 11.000 without known graves)
Thomas Black's name is among the 11,000 inscribed in the Vimy Ridge Memorial- honouring those with no known grave. The Vimy Memorial overlooks the Douai Plain from the highest point of Vimy Ridge, about eight kilometers northeast of Arras on the N17 towards Lens. The memorial is well sign-posted from this road to the left, just before you enter the village of Vimy from the south. On the opening day of the Battle of Arras, 9 April 1917, the four divisions of the Canadian Corps, fighting side by side for the first time, scored a huge tactical victory in the capture of the 60 metre high Vimy Ridge. After the war, the highest point of the ridge was chosen as the site of the great memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the First World War, and particularly to the 60,000 who gave their lives in France. It also bears the names of 11,000 Canadian servicemen who died in France - many of them in the fight for Vimy Ridge - who have no known grave.
Thomas Carrick, K.I.A,  Vimy Memorial, France
Thomas Carrick, K.I.A, Vimy Memorial, France
killed in action, Aug. 19, 1917, at the age of 17, Thomas' body was never recovered, his name is engraved in the Vimy Memorial, honouring the 11,000 Canadian Soldiers, who have no known grave.
Percy Edwards, Vimy Memorial, France
Percy Edwards, Vimy Memorial, France
Pte. Edwards was killed in action, Sept. 15, 1916. in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette. His body was either never found, or if found, never identified, he is commemorated on the Memorial at Vimy Ridge.
Sgt. Fred Stillman, M.M. - Vimy Memorial
Sgt. Fred Stillman, M.M. - Vimy Memorial
STILLMAN, Frederick John M.M.: regimental number 59921, enlisted in the 21st Battalion, in Kingston, November 5, 1914. It had been working in Longford Mills as a clerk, his name was listed in the Longford United Church honour roll in 1921. Born 18 July, 1896, in Campbellford, Seymour, Twp. a son of John Stillman & Jennie Millar. Private Stillman was awarded the Military Medal (MM) for bravery in the field, his Citation reads- " for conspicuous bravery and devotation to duty during operations at St. Eloi, from April 5th to April 10th,(1916) by holding an advanced postion in front of No. 6 Crater continuously without receiving food, water or ammununition. Pte. Stillman, with five others, having gathered during hours of darkness, the rations, water, and ammunition supply from dead bodies in the vicinity. They wiped out an enemy bombing party of thirty men (two only escaping) who attacked their position. They captured enemy's machine gun grew of three, handing same over to Sgt. of the 31st Battn. They captured enemy scout sent to reconnoiter our posiiton, handing him, over to the 19th. Battn. They were subject to an almost continuous and intense enemy bombardment. Then relieved, so exhausted were they, they had to assited out of the line. These men were temporarily attached to the 6th Bridade Machine Gun Company." He was promoted several times, in May 1917, he was promoted to rank of Sergeant. He was killed in action, August 15, 1917, in the attack at Hill 70. His body was never recovered. Sgt. Stillman 's name is engraved on a rampart in the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as 'missing, presumed dead' in France.
Jack John Herbert Sheffield, K.I.A.
Jack John Herbert Sheffield, K.I.A.
SHEFFIELD, John Herbert : regimental number 745472, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, November 15, 1915. He was single, 25, a farmer, living in Mara (Brechin). Born in Sutton, a son of Thomas H. Sheffield & Susan F. Bloomfield. After training in Canada, his company went overseas in July 1916. Private Sheffield, was killed in action, November 17, 1917, in Belgium. He is buried in the Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery, Belgium. Grave XXII. GG. 14A. His name appears on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, Branch 488, Concession 4, Brechin.
Sgt. Frederick 'Fred'  John Stillman, MM
Sgt. Frederick 'Fred' John Stillman, MM
STILLMAN, Frederick John M.M.: regimental number 59921, enlisted in the 21st Battalion, in Kingston, November 5, 1914. It had been working in Longford Mills as a clerk, his name was listed in the Longford United Church honour roll in 1921. Born 18 July, 1896, in Campbellford, Seymour, Twp. a son of John Stillman & Jennie Millar. Private Stillman was awarded the Military Medal (MM) for bravery in the field, his Citation reads- " for conspicuous bravery and devotation to duty during operations at St. Eloi, from April 5th to April 10th,(1916) by holding an advanced postion in front of No. 6 Crater continuously without receiving food, water or ammununition. Pte. Stillman, with five others, having gathered during hours of darkness, the rations, water, and ammunition supply from dead bodies in the vicinity. They wiped out an enemy bombing party of thirty men (two only escaping) who attacked their position. They captured enemy's machine gun grew of three, handing same over to Sgt. of the 31st Battn. They captured enemy scout sent to reconnoiter our posiiton, handing him, over to the 19th. Battn. They were subject to an almost continuous and intense enemy bombardment. Then relieved, so exhausted were they, they had to assited out of the line. These men were temporarily attached to the 6th Bridade Machine Gun Company." He was promoted several times, in May 1917, he was promoted to rank of Sergeant. He was killed in action, August 15, 1917, in the attack at Hill 70. His body was never recovered. Sgt. Stillman 's name is engraved on a rampart in the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France. Posted on the ramparts of the Vimy Memorial are the names of over 11,000 Canadian soldiers who were posted as 'missing, presumed dead' in France.
"Dead Man's Penny"--Henry Fountain
"Dead Man's Penny"--Henry Fountain
This plaque is known as the "Dead Man's Penny". It is a piece of military memorabillia that has a sad history attached to it. The heavy, bronze, coaster-sized medal was given after World War I by the British government to families who had sacrificed a loved one during the War. It was meant as a token of appreciation, but because it resembled a British penny, many people considered it an insult, as if their loved one's life was worth only a penny. Some families even returned the plaques to the King. They are now regarded as a rare treasured family heirloom. This medal was given to Ann Fountain, the mother of Henry Fountain, who died in 1918. It has been passed down through the years to her grandson Jack Fountain, Hamilton, and now resides proudly with his widow Velma.
Mike BETSKO- K.I.A. -Passchendaele
Mike BETSKO- K.I.A. -Passchendaele
Pte. Betsko, of Longford Mills, was killed in action Nov. 6, 1917, at Passchendaele-- his body was not recovered, or if recovered, not identified. His name is engraved in panels at Menin Gate (YPRES) Memorial, Belgium. The Menin Gate Memorial bears the names of 54,900 British and Empire soldiers who died between 4th August 1914 and 15th August 1917. Another 35,000 names of those who died later are inscribed at Tyne Cot cemetery. An inscription on the arch reads 'Here are recorded names of officers and men who fell in Ypres salient, but to whom the fortune of war denied the known and honourable burial given to their comrades in death'. The British Government gave £150,000 to build the gate, which was constructed between 1923 and 1927. Every evening at 8.00 two buglers from the local fire brigade sound 'The Last Post' in a moving ceremony under the gate of the arch.
Captain John Donald GLOVER- K.I.A. -Second Battle of Ypres
Captain John Donald GLOVER- K.I.A. -Second Battle of Ypres
Captain Glover of the 97th, was killed in action, Apr. 23, 1915, at Langemarck, Belgium. His body was not recovered, or if recovered, not identified. His name is engraved in a panel in the Menin Gate (Ypres) Memorial, Belgium. The Menin Gate Memorial bears the names of 54,900 British and Empire soldiers who died between 4th August 1914 and 15th August 1917. Another 35,000 names of those who died later are inscribed at Tyne Cot cemetery. An inscription on the arch reads 'Here are recorded names of officers and men who fell in Ypres salient, but to whom the fortune of war denied the known and honourable burial given to their comrades in death'. The British Government gave £150,000 to build the gate, which was constructed between 1923 and 1927. Every evening at 8.00 two buglers from the local fire brigade sound 'The Last Post' in a moving ceremony under the gate of the arch.
Pte. Garnet Joslin. jpg
Pte. Garnet Joslin. jpg
Garnet, a Blacksmith by trade, at the age of 19, enlisted in the 37th Battalion, Oct. 6, 1915. He was born in Rama in 1896, a son of Joseph Thomas Joslin & Addie Hepmstall. While in France in 1917, he was severly burned and scarred by mustard gas, and suffered for the rest of his life. He died in 1966.
Pte. Percy Justin  1898- 1962
Pte. Percy Justin 1898- 1962
JUSTIN, Percival (Percy) : regimental number 2498683, enlisted in the Forestry Depot, in Sudbury, September 29, 1917. He was single, 19, a Woodsman, living in North Bay. Born in Rama (Ramona) in 1898, a son of Robert Justin & Mary Matilda Genno
Pte. John RYAN
Pte. John RYAN
RYAN, John Patrick : regimental number 868199, enlisted in the 182nd (Ontario County) Battalion, April 29, 1916. He was single, 27, a farmer in Mara (Atherly). Born in Rama, in 1888, a son of John Ryan & Mary McGovern. While overseas he was transferred to the 116th Battalion. A grave marker in St. Columbkille’s cemetery, Uptergrove honours his service to our country.
Lieut. I. J. McCorkell, K.I.A.
Lieut. I. J. McCorkell, K.I.A.
Aug. 22. 1918- Orillia Packet & Times Lieut. I. J. McCorkell Killed The first death reported among the Orillia soldiers, as the result of the British offensive, was that of Lieut. Ignatius J. McCorkell, who was killed in action on August 12th. Though not a resident of the town, Lieut. McCorkell had spent so much of his time here, for three years as a student at the Collegiate Institute, and for two years while teaching at Atherley, that he was widely known and very popular. He tried to enlist in the University company which went to reinforce the Princess Pats in the early days of the war, but was rejected on account of his eyes. However, he succeeded in getting into the Ontario County Battalion in October, 1915, and took an active part in recruiting both it and the second battalion. He did not succeed in getting overseas till April, 1917. Four months previously, in December, 1916, he was married to Miss Cecelia Proctor of Beaverton, a niece of Mrs. A. G. Cavana, Orillia. Besides his parents, Lieut. McCorkell is survived by four brothers and four sisters--Peter McCorkell of Superior, Wisconsin; Vincent McCorkell, St. Paul, Minnesota; John McCorkell of Udney; the Rev. E. J. McCorkell, of St. Michael's College, Toronto; Mrs. D. O'Donnell, Mrs. R. Gettings, and Mrs. H. McLaughlin, of Udney, and Mrs. J. O'Leary of Seattle, Washington. Lieut. McCorkell, who was just 23 years of age, was just at the opening of what promised to be a bright career. Had he returned it was his intention to enter the profession of law, and to that end he became articled at Osgoode Hall. He has given his life in a great cause, and his memory will long remain green.
Corporal Orren John Congdon- K.I.A
Corporal Orren John Congdon- K.I.A
Son of Mr. A. Congdon, recently of Atherley, who was missing on July 23rd, 1917, and is now reported dead. He was a member of the Ontario Co. Battalion.-- his name appears on the Mara Twp. Cenotaph- See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Pte. John  James Collins
Pte. John James Collins
COLLINS, John James: regimental number D 3317626, was drafted October 22, 1917. He was single, age 23, a farmer in the Atherley area. Private Collins was born in Mara, con. 12, lot 6, in 1894, a son of John Collins & Mary Catherine Carey. He died September 5, 1920, from Meningitis, first contracted overseas, and is buried in an unmarked grave in St. Andrew's Cemetery, Brechin. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
Gunner Lee Merkley, K.I.A.
Gunner Lee Merkley, K.I.A.
May 9, 1918-Eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Merkley, Atherley, Killed In Action-April 10, 1918. He was a Gunner in the Canadian Field Artillery, 4th Battery, 1st Bde. His name is listed on the Mara Twp. Cenotaph. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Private David MacKenzie-
Private David MacKenzie-
Son of Mr. Murdock Mackenzie, Uptergrove, who died at Aldershot, on August 23rd, 1918, only a week after his arrival in England. His name appears on the Mara Township Cenotaph. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Private Hardy Alfred Smith, K.I.A.
Private Hardy Alfred Smith, K.I.A.
- Son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Smith, Longford Mills, Killed In Action on September 29th, 1918 See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Private Ben Simcoe M.M.
Private Ben Simcoe M.M.
The Packet & Times Oct. 17, 1918 The Rama native who was awarded the Military Medal, is the son of David Simcoe, whose native name is Waydahsun, meaning Sunrise. He comes of a warrior race. His great-grandfather, John Simcoe, whose native name was Windego, was a Shawnee brave who was with Tecumseh, the greatest of all the Natives with whom the white man has come into contact, at Detroit and Queenston Heights, where he found a kindred spirit in General Brock, and also at Moravian Town, where the heroic Shawnee chief laid down his life, while Proctor, the pusillanimous and unworthy white General, fled incontinently. After the war, Windego remained in Canada, and was again in the field with the loyalists in 1837, He settled first at Toronto and afterwards at Christian Island where he died. The Shawnee and Chippewa tongues are closely related. For his part in the war of 1812 he was given a British Medal, and his great-grandson has now added to the family laurels. Private Ben. Simcoe originally enlisted in the 157th Battalion, was transferred to the 177th, and went to France with the 116th. Rama is proud of the hero who has brought honour to himself and to his race.
Pte. James Tennison,  Sebright Memorial
Pte. James Tennison, Sebright Memorial
The Sebright Memorial, in the Sebright United Church Cemetery, honours three local soldiers who gave their live for Liberty and Humanity. Sebright is located on the boundary between the former Rama Township, of Ontario County, and Dalton Township, of Victoria County. Honoured are: Sergt. Noble J. Braden, M.M. of Dalton Twp. Pte. William E. Oxby, of Dalton Twp. Pte. James W. Tennison of Rama Twp.
Garnet Joslin 3
Garnet Joslin 3
For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, under Active Topics, available on the home page.
Private Francis H. Clarke
Private Francis H. Clarke
A Stone honouring Pte. Clarke, in St. Joseph's Cemetery, Bracebridge, Ont. A son of Patrick Clarke & Maria Newman. He died of pneumonia, while overseas and is buried the Grayshott Cemetery, Hampshire, England.
Pte. Campbell, Beaverton Cenotaph
Pte. Campbell, Beaverton Cenotaph
Robert Alexander Campbell, was killed in action, Sept. 13, 1918. His parents had moved from Mara to Beaverton, and his name appears on the Beaverton Cenotaph, honouring his sacrifrice. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Pte. Angus Joseph Bethune, K.I.A.
Pte. Angus Joseph Bethune, K.I.A.
Angus enlisted in the 162nd Parry Sound Battalion JAN. 11, 1916. Born in Rama in 1888, a son of Fergus Bethune & Catherine MacDonald-- was killed in action, November 18, 1917. He is buried in the Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. See 'those who made the supreme sacrifice' in the Veterans section, under Active Topics on the Home page.
Pte. Robert Alexander CAMPBELL, K.I.A.
Pte. Robert Alexander CAMPBELL, K.I.A.
The Campbelll family grave marker in the Knox Gamebridge Cemetery, honours Pte. Campbell, who was killed in action, Sept. 13, 1918, in France. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Capt. John Glover & Sergt. Norman Glover
Capt. John Glover & Sergt. Norman Glover
The family grave marker in the Knox Gamebridge Cemetery, honours thier fallen sons-- THEY GAVE THIER LIVES GLORIOUSLY DEFENDING HOME, KING AND COUNTRY See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Pte. Robert Ernest JUFFS, K.I.A.
Pte. Robert Ernest JUFFS, K.I.A.
Pte. Juffs, was died in the Battle of Amiens, Aug.. 8, 1918. His name appears in the First World War, Book of Remembrance. The official recording of Canada's war dead is the Books of Remembrance which in the Memorial Chamber in the Peace Tower on Parliament Hill. Because not all Canadians, or descendants of these soldiers' families, have the opportunity to view the Books of Remembrance in person, we are fortunate that they have been digitized and images of the pages placed on line.
Richard Godfrey BLACK
Richard Godfrey BLACK
This grave marker in the Athereley Union Cemetery, honours Richard, who in 1916, enlisted in the 177th Battalion, and also enlisted in WWII-- he died while in the service in 1942.
 WW I Medals
WW I Medals
Military Medal (M.M.) awared for bravery in the field. / 1914-1915 Star. / British War Medal./ Victory Medal 1914-1918
Pte. Thomas H. Black, K.I.A.
Pte. Thomas H. Black, K.I.A.
The family grave marker in the Athereley Union Cemetery, pays honour to Pte. Black, killed in action,at Hill 70, in France. August 19, 1917. His body was never recovered, his name is appears on the rampart in the Vimy Memorial. For more details- read 'THOSE WHO PAID THE SUPREME SACRIFICE' in the Vertans section- under active topics- available on the front page of this site.
HMNS HOOD 1920 Vancover
HMNS HOOD 1920 Vancover
This is not the famous"Hood" sunk by the Bismark but an older ship scraped in the thirties as per Herb Furnis
Sgt. Bert McAuley
Sgt. Bert McAuley
Herbert, was a Trainman, when he enlisted at the age of 26, with his friend James Mahoney, in the 75th battalion. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, under Active Topics, available on the home page.
Pte. Archibald L. MacDonald, M.M.
Pte. Archibald L. MacDonald, M.M.
at the age of 21, enlisted in the 157th Simcoe Foresters Bn., Feb. 14, 1916. He was awarded a Military Medal, for bravery in the field. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, under Active Topics, available on the home page.
Pte. Orren John Congdon- Vimy Memorial
Pte. Orren John Congdon- Vimy Memorial
This memorial lists the name of 11,000 Canadians, with no known grave. The following soldiers from Rama & Mara are included, and have their names engraved in the panel. THOMAS HOWARD BLACK, THOMAS CARRICK, ORREN JOHN CONGDON, PERCY EDWARDS, ROBERT GEORGE GOWANLOCK, ALPHONSE PATRICK KELLY, FRED STILLMAN M.M.,
St. Germaine Brothers
St. Germaine Brothers
For more details on these Soldiers read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, under Active Topics, available on the home page.
Prv. David Guthrie, no. 2398308, 4th Platoon, 16th Light Horse, Regina, Sask.
Prv. David Guthrie, no. 2398308, 4th Platoon, 16th Light Horse, Regina, Sask.
Pte. Wm. MORRISON
Pte. Wm. MORRISON
William John Morrison, at the age of 19, enlisted in the 81st Bn., Sept. 16, 1915. He was latter transferred to the 208th Canadian Irish Bn. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, under Active Topics, available on the home page.
Andrew Carrick, lived on Switch Road, Rama
Andrew Carrick, lived on Switch Road, Rama
A typical camp scene Seafront, August 1917, Nacie (Lieut I J  (McCorkell- Ignatius)
A typical camp scene Seafront, August 1917, Nacie (Lieut I J (McCorkell- Ignatius)
Thomas Carrick ; Vimy Memorial
Thomas Carrick ; Vimy Memorial
Pte. Carrick's name is engraved in panels of the Vimy MemoriaL. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial is a memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the the Great War of 1914-1918. 60,000 Canadians were killed. Over 11,000 of those killed died in France but they have no known grave. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial bears the inscribed names of 11,168 missing Canadians, killed in action in France but whose remains have not been found or identified.(1)
Lieut I J (Ignatius) McCorkell &his platoon, WWI
Lieut I J (Ignatius) McCorkell &his platoon, WWI
Pte. H. FOUNTAIN, K.I.A.
Pte. H. FOUNTAIN, K.I.A.
from the Orillia Times, 24 Oct. 1918--PTE. FOUNTAIN KILLED--- On Wednesday, October 16, Mrs. Annie Fountain, of Uptergrove, recieved word that her youngest son, Pte. H. Fountain, had been killed in action on September 27. Pte. Fountain was 21 yeas of age and had worked in Orillia for some time prior to his enlistment. He went overseas about a year ago and had been in France a very short time. Besides his mother he leaves three brothers, Mr. Jas. Fountiain, of Toronto: Mr. Peter Fountain, Orillia: and Ambrose Fountain, Hull, P.Q. and five sisters, Mrs. Wm. Doherty, Uptergrove: Mrs. Ed. Doherty, Orillia: Mrs. David Thornton, Barrie: Mrs. Frank Monnings, Port Arthur, and Mrs. S. Geddis of Hamilton.
Percy Edwards; Vimy Memorial
Percy Edwards; Vimy Memorial
Pte. Edwards' name is engraved in the panels of the Vimy Memorial. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial is a memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the the Great War of 1914-1918. 60,000 Canadians were killed. Over 11,000 of those killed died in France but they have no known grave. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial bears the inscribed names of 11,168 missing Canadians, killed in action in France but whose remains have not been found or identified.
Robert  Gowanlock; Vimy Memorial
Robert Gowanlock; Vimy Memorial
Pte. Gowanlock's name is engraved in the panels of the Vimy Memorial. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial is a memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the the Great War of 1914-1918. 60,000 Canadians were killed. Over 11,000 of those killed died in France but they have no known grave. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial bears the inscribed names of 11,168 missing Canadians, killed in action in France but whose remains have not been found or identified.
Alphonse Patrick Kelly; Vimy Memorial
Alphonse Patrick Kelly; Vimy Memorial
Pte. Kelly's name is engraved in the panels of the Vimy Memorial, note they made a error in his initials it should be A.P. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial is a memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the the Great War of 1914-1918. 60,000 Canadians were killed. Over 11,000 of those killed died in France but they have no known grave. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial bears the inscribed names of 11,168 missing Canadians, killed in action in France but whose remains have not been found or identified.
Pte. Milton Clarke
Pte. Milton Clarke
Newspaper article from the Toronto Star, Dec. 14, 1916. He is buried in the Villers Station Cemetery, Pas de Calis, France. see 'those who made the supreme sacrifice' in the Veteran section, under Active Topics, on the homepage.
Pte. Arnold Curran, K.I.A.
Pte. Arnold Curran, K.I.A.
Private Curran, of Rama (Sebright), a son of Mary Curran, was wounded at the Battle of Amiens, he died from these wounds, 11 Aug., 1918. He is buried in the Viller-Bretonneux Military Cemetery, Somme, France. The CURRAN Family stone in the Sebright United Church Cemetery, honours Arnold's sacrifice for his country.
Fred Stillman M.M. ; Vimy Memorial
Fred Stillman M.M. ; Vimy Memorial
Pte. Stiilman's name is engraved in the panels on the Vimy Memorial. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial is a memorial to all Canadians who served their country in battle during the the Great War of 1914-1918. 60,000 Canadians were killed. Over 11,000 of those killed died in France but they have no known grave. The Canadian National Vimy Memorial bears the inscribed names of 11,168 missing Canadians, killed in action in France but whose remains have not been found or identified.(1)
Nelson Clarke Kenny
Nelson Clarke Kenny
Nelson's parents relocated to Fern Cottage, near Atherley, prior to him enlisting.
Herbert Thomas Stamp; Ypres Menin Gate Memorial
Herbert Thomas Stamp; Ypres Menin Gate Memorial
Pte. Stamp's name is engraved in the panels of the Menin Gate Memorial. The Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing is one of four British and Commonwealth memorials to the missing in the battlefield area of the Ypres Salient in Belgian Flanders. The memorial bears the names of 54,389 officers and men from United Kingdom and Commonwealth Forces (except New Zealand and Newfoundland) who fell in the Ypres Salient before 16th August 1917 and who have no known grave.
Pte. A.S. Morton
Pte. A.S. Morton
Toronto Star, newspaper clippings.
Rama Reserve Soldiers
Rama Reserve Soldiers
(L)Pte. Bert Williams, (center) Pte. Ben Sawyer, (R) Pte. William Simcoe
Pte. Sam GINSBERG
Pte. Sam GINSBERG
enlisted at 17, a student at Orillia Collegiate Instutude, celebrated his 18th birthday on the Ocean, and his 19th birthday in the Trenches. He had four brothers and two sisters. He died from wounds on May 3, 1917. His parents operated a General Store in Brechin and Washago. see "those who made the supreme sacrifice" in the Veterans section, under Active Topics, on the homepage.
Lieut. James Dolan
Lieut. James Dolan
from the 29 Aug. 1918, Orillia Times-- Lieut. James J. Dolan, was admitted, August 9, to the 8th General Hospital, Rouen, France, suffering fom gunshot wounds in his right arm. Lieut. Dolan is a son of Mr. Patrick Dolan, Uptergrove, and is 32 yeas of age. He enlisted in Toronto with the 178th Canadian Buffs, July 1916, and went overseas Feb. 5, 1917. He was transferred to another Battalion and went over to France in January last, and therefore, was seven months in the trenches. Prior to enlisting Lieut. Dolan had been employed for nine years as a bookkeeeper for O'Neil & Co., of Toronto.
Pte. Sam Ginsberg Article
Pte. Sam Ginsberg Article
This article appeared on the front page of the Orillia Times, Thursday May 31, 1917.
Pte. W. J. WILLIAMS
Pte. W. J. WILLIAMS
Killed in action Aug. 8, 1918.
St. Paul's  Church, Washago
St. Paul's Church, Washago
Honour Roll of members of the congregation, who served in WW1.
Lnd. Gazatte-- A.W. LEITH-D.C.M.
Lnd. Gazatte-- A.W. LEITH-D.C.M.
This is an excerpt of the London Gazette, issue 31128, 14 Jan, 1919, page 825, and part of page 856.
James (Hugh) McGovern
James (Hugh) McGovern
Hugh James McGOVERN, born in Mara, a son of Peter McGovern and Roseanna Corrigan. James relocated to Edmonton Alberta, around 1910, and enlisted in the army in 1915. After the war he returned to Edmonton, where he died in 1938, and is buried in the Soldier's plot, in the Edmonton Cemetery. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, available on the home page
Pte. T.J. Donnelly
Pte. T.J. Donnelly
later reported as a prisoner of war. From the Toronto Star, Monday May 17, 1915.
Stephen Guy VYSE, M.M.
Stephen Guy VYSE, M.M.
VYSE, Stephen Guy M.M. : regimental number 745521, enlisted in the 116th (Ontario County) Battalion, March 9, 1916. He was single, 36, a Stationery Engineer, living in Brechin. Born in Mara, in 1880, a son of William Vyse & Margaret London. Brother to George & Richard. While serving overseas, Pte. Vyse was awarded the Military Medal for Bravery in the Field. He married his wife Edith Florance HART of England, in London England, in 1919. They returned to Canada, where they raised their family, and they are buried in the Stone Church Cemetery, Beaverton.
Lieutenant James Ignatius McCORKELL
Lieutenant James Ignatius McCORKELL
McCORKELL James Ignatius: he enlisted October 13, 1915, as a Lieutenant of the 116th (Ontario County) Infantry Battalion. He was a school teacher in Atherley, Mara S.S. #5, from 1913 to 1915. While training in Canada, he served as a recruiter for the 116th, his name appears on the Attestation papers of several Mara & Rama recruits. Born in Mara, in 1895, a son of Patrick Joseph McCorkell & Mary O'Donnell. Just prior to his departure overseas, Lieutenant McCorkell, was married to Cecilia Proctor, in December 1916. He had obtained a Captaincy, but in order to get into action quicker, he reverted to the rank of Lieutenant. He was killed in action, August 12, 1918, at the age of 23, and is buried in Bouchoir New British Cemetery, Somme, France. grave II.B.57. The stone reads, 'Lieut. J. I. J. McCorkell, 116th Battalion Canadian Infantry/12th August 1918 Age 23/Greater love than this no man hath/that he lay down his life for his friends'. His name also appears in the 'Roll of Honour of the Ontario Teachers who served in the Great War 1914-1918' published by Ryerson Press: 1922. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
2-Vimy--60,000 Canadiians died in France -WW1--11 000 with no  marker
2-Vimy--60,000 Canadiians died in France -WW1--11 000 with no marker
6= Vimy--Thomas Howard Black---Thomas Carrick--Percy Edwards---Robert George Gowanlock---Alphonse Patrick Kelly
Lieutenant McCorkell and his wife, Cecilia Proctor
Lieutenant McCorkell and his wife, Cecilia Proctor
McCORKELL James Ignatius: he enlisted October 13, 1915, as a Lieutenant of the 116th (Ontario County) Infantry Battalion. He was a school teacher in Atherley, Mara S.S. #5, from 1913 to 1915. While training in Canada, he served as a recruiter for the 116th, his name appears on the Attestation papers of several Mara & Rama recruits. Born in Mara, in 1895, a son of Patrick Joseph McCorkell & Mary O'Donnell. Just prior to his departure overseas, Lieutenant McCorkell, was married to Cecilia Proctor, in December 1916. He had obtained a Captaincy, but in order to get into action quicker, he reverted to the rank of Lieutenant. He was killed in action, August 12, 1918, at the age of 23, and is buried in Bouchoir New British Cemetery, Somme, France. grave II.B.57. The stone reads, 'Lieut. J. I. J. McCorkell, 116th Battalion Canadian Infantry/12th August 1918 Age 23/Greater love than this no man hath/that he lay down his life for his friends'. His name also appears in the 'Roll of Honour of the Ontario Teachers who served in the Great War 1914-1918' published by Ryerson Press: 1922. His name is listed on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Brechin Legion, 4th Concession, Brechin.
H. T. J. Stamp
H. T. J. Stamp
Pte. David MacKenzie
Pte. David MacKenzie
grave marker of Pte. David MacKenzie in the Fairvalley Methodist Cemetery, a soldier in the 8th Reserve Battalion, he died on natural causes, while in training in England, Aug. 23, 1918. He body was returned to Canada, for burial.
Pte. William Joseph GETTONS
Pte. William Joseph GETTONS
Enlisted in the 116th Battalion, Aprl 15, 1916. He died while in the service, three days after the end of the war, Nov. 14, 1918. He is burried in St. Columbkille's Cemetery. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
John Edward MURRIN
John Edward MURRIN
Born in the USA, in 1875, he enlisted in the 182nd Battalion, June 8, 1916, he died in the Christie Street Military Hospital in Toronto, March 13, 1922, from war related illness. His grave marker in St. Andrew's Cemetery, Brechin, honours his service for Canada.
Pte. Fred McDonald
Pte. Fred McDonald
McDonald, Frederick Duncan : regimental number 859853. enlisted in the 179th Battalion, March 27, 1916, in Winnipeg. He was 33, single, a cook. Born in 1882, in Victoria County, the eldest son of Donald McDonald & Flora Dougherty, he was raised in Rama Township. Overseas he served in the 43rd Battalion. Private McDonald, died November 20, 1919, at the Spadina Military Hospital in Toronto, of disease contacted while overseas. He is buried in the Sebright Union Cemetery. ( His brother Donald Edward, also served overseas, however, he signed his name 'MacDonald' )
Pte. Alphonse Patrick Kelly, K.I.A.
Pte. Alphonse Patrick Kelly, K.I.A.
Alphonse enlisted in the 75th Bn. July 30, 1915, at the age of 19. He was born in Brechin, in 1896, a son of Pattrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell. Pte. Kelly was killed by a sniper, November 18, 1916, in Somme, France. His name is listed on the Vimy Memorial, in France. He had three brothers who also served overseas, Emmett, Peter, & Tombais See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Alphonse Kelly death telegram
Alphonse Kelly death telegram
Part of the Kelly/O'Donnell File
Army
Army
AIR FORCE
AIR FORCE
Pte. Emmett Kelly
Pte. Emmett Kelly
Drafted Oct. 5, 1917, a son of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell. He was born in Mara(Brechin) in 1897. one of four sons of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell, who serverd in WWI. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, available on the home page
Tommy Carrick ,KiIA---Ernest Carrick--Died of wounds--Thomas Carrick--KIA-(cousin)
Tommy Carrick ,KiIA---Ernest Carrick--Died of wounds--Thomas Carrick--KIA-(cousin)
See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage ______________________________________________________ PRIVATE ERNEST NELSON CARRICK KILLED-- son of John Carrrick & Mary Ida McDaniels, died from battlefield wounds, in Somme, France, Sept. 8, 1916. He is buried the Kensal Green Cemetery, London, England. The family grave marker in the Romona Cemetery pays tribute to his sacrifice. PRIVATE THOS. CARRICK KILLED (cousin of Ernest) August 19, 1917--his body was never recoverd, his name appears on the Vimy Memorial, in Pas de Calais, France Mrs. John Carrick, Washago, was notified on Friday that her son, Private Thomas Carrick had been killed in action on August 19th. Private Carrick was only 18 years of age. He went overseas with the Ontario county battalion. A brother, Private Nathan Carrick, went over with the 177th Simcoe Battalion. Besides his mother, three sisters and a brother also survive, who have the sympathy of many friends.
Navy
Navy
Sgt.  Peter  Kelly
Sgt. Peter Kelly
Enlisted in the 11th Regiment of the Canadian Mounted Rifles, Sept. 14, 1914 less than a month after the War was declared ,and discharged in 1919. While overseas he earned the rank of Sergeant. He was awarded France's Medaille Militaire (Military Medal) for an act of bravery in action against an enemy force. Peter was born in Mara Twp. (Brechin) in 1887, a son of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell. one of four sons of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell, who serverd in WWI. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, available on the home page
Pte. Tobias (Dinnie) Kelly
Pte. Tobias (Dinnie) Kelly
Enlisted in the 6th Cyclists Platoon. He was born in Mara Twp. (Brechin) in 1893, a son of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell. one of four sons of Patrick Kelly & Catherine O'Donnell, who serverd in WWI. For more details on this Soldier read, “THOSE WHO SERVED FOR KING & COUNTY” in the VETERANS section, available on the home page
ww1 medals
ww1 medals
World War 1, medals awarded to CEF Soldiers
Lance Corporal, William Chester Barnes-KIA
Lance Corporal, William Chester Barnes-KIA
Lance Corporal William Chester Barnes, killed in action, October 1, 1918, by enemy machine gun fire, while in charge of a Lewis Gun section, Abancourt, France, at the age of 21, nine days before his 22nd birthday. Son of William Charles Barnes & Hanna Jane Hargrave, born in Rama (Sebright) Oct. 10, 1896, he later lived in Mara (Udney), brother of Belle, Mary, Gertrude, George, Mae, Pearl, James, John, Annie. His name appears on the Mara Cenotaph, located in front of the Legion, Br. 488, on the 4th Conession, in Brechin. See “THOSE WHO MADE THE SUPREME SACRIFICE” in the Veterans section, under Active Topics—available on the Homepage
Website Exec.


Submission Committee:
Frances Laver
Lisa Burke
Fred Lamb
Mike Crosby


Content:
P.D.McNamee

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