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Carden-Dalton Gazette

These are significantly historical articules submitted by our correspondants

Reaserch by Frances Laver

General Observations
• There were Pathmasters who looked after certain sections of the road.
• They were always making repairs to the Narrows Bridge. Finally Council decided to ask the County to take it over. There were many meetings about this. James Graham had to go to Toronto about the matter. It also seemed to be in the courts. It was measured to show it was over 300 feet wide which seemed to be in the realm of what the County must look after.
• Statute of Labour – people worked so many days on road?
• Had fence viewers. Pound Keepers
• Always buying scrapers for the roads.
• Names were added to the voters’ list. Presumably these men had reached the age of 21
• Each year it states how much money went to the School Sections
• Each year there was a Court of Revision for changes in assessment of taxes.
• Certain people were appointed Commissioners to repair a certain part of the roads.
• Money was given to The Hospital for Sick Children each year.
• The Muskoka Sanitarium asked for money but did get any.
• Many people were notified to remove their fences off road allowances.
• A County Road System was proposed but his township opposed it.
• Some money was spent getting someone into the House of Refuge.
• Worked with The Trent Valley Canal over bridges and flooding.

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In 1921 there were 41 male persons living on there original land patents out of 204 There were 42 or another 20% of the original patentees living on differant farms in the Township
In 2012′ Martin McNamee, Leo Wylie are the only ones I can recall the still own part of the original land patent–there are more ????

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This articule researched by Carden correspondent Frances Laver
The story of Longford Township is one of tall pine timber, crashing logs on flooding waters, sturdy lumberjacks and raging forest fires. It is the story of the South Ontario lumber industry itself. It began back in May 1865 when all the land forming the township was sold to the Canadian Land and Emigration Company. Another historical move took place in 1867 when John Thompson, a lumberman, purchased it for $33,000. In 1900 the pine timber limits almost exhausted, the land was purchased by the Standard Chemical Company which sought the remaining hardwood in the country
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Submission Committee:
Frances Laver
Lisa Burke
Fred Lamb
Mike Crosby


Content:
P.D.McNamee

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